International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Barbara Masucci

Affiliation: Universita' di Salerno

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2006
EPRINT
Provably-Secure Time-Bound Hierarchical Key Assignment Schemes
A time-bound hierarchical key assignment scheme is a method to assign time-dependent encryption keys to a set of classes in a partially ordered hierarchy, in such a way that each class can compute the keys of all classes lower down in the hierarchy, according to temporal constraints. In this paper we design and analyze time-bound hierarchical key assignment schemes which are provably-secure and efficient. We consider both the unconditionally secure and the computationally secure settings and distinguish between two different goals: security with respect to key indistinguishability and against key recovery. We first present definitions of security with respect to both goals in the unconditionally secure setting and we show tight lower bounds on the size of the private information distributed to each class. Then, we consider the computational setting and we further distinguish security against static and adaptive adversarial behaviors. We explore the relations between all possible combinations of security goals and adversarial behaviors and, in particular, we prove that security against adaptive adversaries is (polynomially) equivalent to security against static adversaries. Afterwards, we prove that a recently proposed scheme is insecure against key recovery. Finally, we propose two different constructions for time-bound key assignment schemes. The first one is based on symmetric encryption schemes, whereas, the second one makes use of bilinear maps. Both constructions support updates to the access hierarchy with local changes to the public information and without requiring any private information to be re-distributed. These appear to be the first constructions for time-bound hierarchical key assignment schemes which are simultaneously practical and provably-secure.
2006
EPRINT
Efficient Provably-Secure Hierarchical Key Assignment Schemes
A hierarchical key assignment scheme is a method to assign some private information and encryption keys to a set of classes in a partially ordered hierarchy, in such a way that the private information of a higher class can be used to derive the keys of all classes lower down in the hierarchy. In this paper we design and analyze hierarchical key assignment schemes which are provably-secure and support dynamic updates to the hierarchy with local changes to the public information and without requiring any private information to be re-distributed. We first consider the problem of constructing a hierarchical key assignment scheme by using as a building block a symmetric encryption scheme. We propose a new construction which is provably secure with respect to key indistinguishability, requires a single computational assumption, and improves on previous proposals. Then, we show how to reduce key derivation time at the expense of an increment of the amount of public information, by improving a previous result. Finally, we show how to construct a hierarchical key assignment scheme by using as a building block a public-key broadcast encryption scheme. In particular, one of our constructions provides constant private information and public information linear in the number of classes in the hierarchy.
2006
EPRINT
New Constructions for Provably-Secure Time-Bound Hierarchical Key Assignment Schemes
A time-bound hierarchical key assignment scheme is a method to assign time-dependent encryption keys to a set of classes in a partially ordered hierarchy, in such a way that each class in the hierarchy can compute the keys of all classes lower down in the hierarchy, according to temporal constraints. In this paper we propose new constructions for time-bound hierarchical key assignment schemes which are provably secure with respect to key indistinguishability. Our constructions use as a building block any provably-secure hierarchical key assignment scheme without temporal constraints and exhibit a tradeoff among the amount of private information held by each class, the amount of public data, the complexity of key derivation, and the computational assumption on which their security is based. Moreover, the proposed schemes support updates to the access hierarchy with local changes to the public information and without requiring any private information to be re-distributed.
2001
EPRINT
A Linear Algebraic Approach to Metering Schemes
A metering scheme is a method by which an audit agency is able to measure the interaction between servers and clients during a certain number of time frames. Naor and Pinkas proposed metering schemes where any server is able to compute a proof, i.e., a value to be shown to the audit agency at the end of each time frame, if and only if it has been visited by a number of clients larger than or equal to some threshold $h$ during the time frame. Masucci and Stinson showed how to construct a metering scheme realizing any access structure, where the access structure is the family of all subsets of clients which enable a server to compute its proof. They also provided lower bounds on the communication complexity of metering schemes. In this paper we describe a linear algebraic approach to design metering schemes realizing any access structure. Namely, given any access structure, we present a method to construct a metering scheme realizing it from any linear secret sharing scheme with the same access structure. Besides, we prove some properties about the relationship between metering schemes and secret sharing schemes. These properties provide some new bounds on the information distributed to clients and servers in a metering scheme. According to these bounds, the optimality of the metering schemes obtained by our method relies upon the optimality of the linear secret sharing schemes for the given access structure.
2000
EPRINT
Constructions and Bounds for Unconditionally Secure Commitment Schemes
Commitment schemes have been extensively studied since they were introduced by Blum in 1982. Rivest recently showed how to construct unconditionally secure commitment schemes, assuming the existence of a trusted initializer. In this paper, we present a formal mathematical model for such schemes, and analyze their binding and concealing properties. In particular, we show that such schemes cannot be perfectly concealing: there is necessarily a small probability that Alice can cheat Bob by committing to one value but later revealing a different value. We prove several bounds on Alice's cheating probability, and present constructions of schemes that achieve optimal cheating probabilities. We also show a close link between commitment schemes and the classical ``affine resolvable designs''.