International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Long Chen

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2020
ASIACRYPT
CCA Updatable Encryption Against Malicious Re-Encryption Attacks 📺
Long Chen Ya-Nan Li Qiang Tang
Updatable encryption (UE) is an attractive primitive, which allows the secret key of the outsourced encrypted data to be updated to a fresh one periodically. Several elegant works exist studying various security properties. We notice several major issues in existing security models of (ciphertext dependent) updatable encryption, in particular, integrity and CCA security. The adversary in the models is only allowed to request the server to re-encrypt {\em honestly} generated ciphertext, while in practice, an attacker could try to inject arbitrary ciphertexts into the server as she wishes. Those malformed ciphertext could be updated and leveraged by the adversary and cause serious security issues. In this paper, we fill the gap and strengthen the security definitions in multiple aspects: most importantly our integrity and CCA security models remove the restriction in previous models and achieve standard notions of integrity and CCA security in the setting of updatable encryption. Along the way, we refine the security model to capture post-compromise security and enhance the re-encryption indistinguishability to the CCA style. Guided by the new models, we provide a novel construction \recrypt, which satisfies our strengthened security definitions. The technical building block of homomorphic hash from a group may be of independent interests. We also study the relations among security notions; and a bit surprisingly, the folklore result in authenticated encryption that IND-CPA plus ciphertext integrity imply IND-CCA security does {\em not} hold for ciphertext dependent updatable encryption.
2018
CRYPTO
IND-CCA-Secure Key Encapsulation Mechanism in the Quantum Random Oracle Model, Revisited 📺
With the gradual progress of NIST’s post-quantum cryptography standardization, the Round-1 KEM proposals have been posted for public to discuss and evaluate. Among the IND-CCA-secure KEM constructions, mostly, an IND-CPA-secure (or OW-CPA-secure) public-key encryption (PKE) scheme is first introduced, then some generic transformations are applied to it. All these generic transformations are constructed in the random oracle model (ROM). To fully assess the post-quantum security, security analysis in the quantum random oracle model (QROM) is preferred. However, current works either lacked a QROM security proof or just followed Targhi and Unruh’s proof technique (TCC-B 2016) and modified the original transformations by adding an additional hash to the ciphertext to achieve the QROM security.In this paper, by using a novel proof technique, we present QROM security reductions for two widely used generic transformations without suffering any ciphertext overhead. Meanwhile, the security bounds are much tighter than the ones derived by utilizing Targhi and Unruh’s proof technique. Thus, our QROM security proofs not only provide a solid post-quantum security guarantee for NIST Round-1 KEM schemes, but also simplify the constructions and reduce the ciphertext sizes. We also provide QROM security reductions for Hofheinz-Hövelmanns-Kiltz modular transformations (TCC 2017), which can help to obtain a variety of combined transformations with different requirements and properties.
2018
ASIACRYPT
On the Hardness of the Computational Ring-LWR Problem and Its Applications
In this paper, we propose a new assumption, the Computational Learning With Rounding over rings, which is inspired by the computational Diffie-Hellman problem. Assuming the hardness of R-LWE, we prove this problem is hard when the secret is small, uniform and invertible. From a theoretical point of view, we give examples of a key exchange scheme and a public key encryption scheme, and prove the worst-case hardness for both schemes with the help of a random oracle. Our result improves both speed, as a result of not requiring Gaussian secret or noise, and size, as a result of rounding. In practice, our result suggests that decisional R-LWR based schemes, such as Saber, Round2 and Lizard, which are among the most efficient solutions to the NIST post-quantum cryptography competition, stem from a provable secure design. There are no hardness results on the decisional R-LWR with polynomial modulus prior to this work, to the best of our knowledge.
2017
TCC