International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Douglas R. Stinson

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2010
EPRINT
Short One-Time Signatures
G.M. Zaverucha D.R. Stinson
We present a new one-time signature scheme having short signatures. Our new scheme supports aggregation, batch veri fication, and admits efficient proofs of knowledge. It has a fast signing algorithm, requiring only modular additions, and its veri fication cost is comparable to ECDSA verifi cation. These properties make our scheme suitable for applications on resource-constrained devices such as smart cards and sensor nodes. Along the way, we give a unifi ed description of fi ve previous one-time signature schemes and improve parameter selection for these schemes, and as a corollary we give a fail-stop signature scheme with short signatures.
2010
EPRINT
On the Complexity of the Herding Attack and Some Related Attacks on Hash Functions
D.R. Stinson J. Upadhyay
In this paper, we analyze the complexity of the construction of the 2^k-diamond structure proposed by Kelsey and Kohno. We point out a flaw in their analysis and show that their construction may not produce the desired diamond structure. We then give a more rigorous and detailed complexity analysis of the construction of a diamond structure. For this, we appeal to random graph theory, which allows us to determine sharp necessary and sufficient conditions for the message complexity (i.e., the number of hash computations required to build the required structure). We also analyze the computational complexity for constructing a diamond structure, which has not been previously studied in the literature. Finally, we study the impact of our analysis on herding and other attacks that use the diamond structure as a subroutine. Precisely, our results shows the following: 1. The message complexity for the construction of a diamond structure is \sqrt{k} times more than what was previously stated in literature. 2. The time complexity is n times the message complexity, where n is the size of hash value. Due to above two results, the complexity of the herding attack and the second preimage attack on iterated hash functions have increased complexity. We also show that the message complexity of herding and second preimage attacks on "hash twice'' is n times the claimed complexity, by giving a more detailed analysis of the attack.
2009
EPRINT
Anonymity in Shared Symmetric Key Primitives
Gregory M. Zaverucha Douglas R. Stinson
We provide a stronger definition of anonymity in the context of shared symmetric key primitives, and show that existing schemes do not provide this level of anonymity. A new scheme is presented to share symmetric key operations amongst a set of participants according to a $(t,n)$-threshold access structure. We quantify the amount of information the output of the shared operation provides about the group of participants which collaborated to produce it.
2008
EPRINT
How To Ensure Forward and Backward Untraceability of RFID Identification Schemes By Using A Robust PRBG
J. Wu D.R. Stinson
In this paper, we analyze an RFID identification scheme which is designed to provide forward untraceability and backward untraceability. We show that if a standard cryptographic pseudorandom bit generator (PRBG) is used in the scheme, then the scheme may fail to provide forward untraceability and backward untraceability. To achieve the desired untraceability features, the scheme can use a robust PRBG which provides forward security and backward security. We also note that the backward security is stronger than necessary for the backward untraceability of the scheme.
2008
EPRINT
Two attacks on a sensor network key distribution scheme of Cheng and Agrawal
M. B. Paterson D. R. Stinson
A sensor network key distribution scheme for hierarchical sensor networks was recently proposed by Cheng and Agrawal. A feature of their scheme is that pairwise keys exist between any pair of high-level nodes (which are called cluster heads) and between any (low-level) sensor node and the nearest cluster head. We present two attacks on their scheme. The first attack can be applied for certain parameter sets. If it is applicable, then this attack can result in the compromise of most if not all of the sensor node keys after a small number of cluster heads are compromised. The second attack can always be applied, though it is weaker.
2008
EPRINT
On The Security of The ElGamal Encryption Scheme and Damgard’s Variant
J. Wu D.R. Stinson
In this paper, we discuss the security of the ElGamal encryption scheme and its variant by Damgard. For the ElGamal encryption, we show that (1) under the generalized knowledge-of-exponent assumption and the one-more discrete log assumption, ElGamal encryption is one-way under nonadaptive chosen cipher attacks; (2) one-wayness of ElGamal encryption under non-adaptive chosen cipher attacks is equivalent to the hardness of one-more computational Diffie-Hellman problem. For a variant of ElGamal encryption proposed by Damgard (DEG), we give a new proof that DEG is semantically secure against non-adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks under the one-more decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption (although the same result for DEG security has been presented in the literature before, our proof is simpler). We also give a new security proof for DEG based on the decisional Diffie- Hellman assumption (DDHA) and a weaker version of the knowledge-of-exponent assumption (KEA), and note that KEA is stronger than necessary in the security proof of DEG, for which KEA was originally proposed.
2008
EPRINT
Recognition in Ad Hoc Pervasive Networks
Atefeh Mashatan Douglas R. Stinson
We examine the problem of message and entity recognition in the context of ad hoc networks. We review the definitions and the security model described in the literature and examine previous recognition protocols described in ABCLMN98, HWGW05, LZWW05, M03, and WW03. We prove that there is a one to one correspondence between non-interactive message recognition protocols and digital signature schemes. Hence, we concentrate on designing interactive recognition protocols. We look at LZWW05 in more detail and suggest a variant to overcome a certain shortcoming. In particular, in case of communication failure or adversarial disruption, this protocol is not equipped with a practical resynchronization process and can fail to resume. We propose a variant of this protocol which is equipped with a resynchronization technique that allows users to resynchronize whenever they wish or when they suspect an intrusion.
2008
EPRINT
A New Message Recognition Protocol for Ad Hoc Pervasive Networks
Atefeh Mashatan Douglas R. Stinson
We propose a message recognition protocol which is suitable for ad hoc pervasive networks without the use of hash chains. Hence, we no longer require the sensor motes to save values of a hash chain in their memories. This relaxes the memory requirements. Moreover, we do not need to fix the total number of times the protocol can be executed which implies a desired flexibility in this regard. Furthermore, our protocol is secure without having to consider families of assumptions that depend on the number of sessions the protocol is executed. Hence, the security does not weaken as the protocol is executed over time. Last but not least, we provide a practical procedure for resynchronization in case of any adversarial disruption or communication failure.
2008
EPRINT
Combinatorial batch codes
M. B. Paterson D. R. Stinson R. Wei
In this paper, we study batch codes, which were introduced by Ishai, Kushilevitz, Ostrovsky and Sahai. A batch code specifies a method to distribute a database of n items among m devices (servers) in such a way that any k items can be retrieved by reading at most t items from each of the servers. It is of interest to devise batch codes that minimize the total storage, denoted by N, over all m servers. In this paper, we study the special case t=1, under the assumption that every server stores a subset of the items. This is purely a combinatorial problem, so we call this kind of batch code a "combinatorial batch code''. For various parameter situations, we are able to present batch codes that are optimal with respect to the storage requirement, N. We also study uniform codes, where every item is stored in precisely c of the m servers (such a code is said to have rate 1/c). Interesting new results are presented in the cases c = 2, k-2 and k-1. In addition, we obtain improved existence results for arbitrary fixed c using the probabilistic method.
2007
EPRINT
Authorship Proof for Textual Document
J. Wu D. R. Stinson
In this paper, we investigate the problem of how to prove the authorship of textual documents. First we define the basic functionalities of an authorship proof scheme (APS) based on natural language watermarking, and identify two essential security requirements for an APS to be secure against various attacks. We review existing natural language watermarking schemes, and we propose two new schemes with improved security.
2007
EPRINT
A Zero-Knowledge Identification and Key Agreement Protocol
D.R. Stinson J. Wu
In this paper, we propose a zero-knowledge authenticated key agreement protocol with key confirmation (AKC) in asymmetric setting. The protocol has several desirable security attributes like some classical AKCs such as STS and MQV. One highlight of our protocol is its zero-knowledge property, which enables succinct proofs of the claimed security attributes, while the overhead in communication and computation resulting from the special design to achieve zero-knowledge is insignificant.
2007
EPRINT
A Bound on the Size of Separating Hash Families
The paper provides an upper bound on the size of a (generalised) separating hash family, a notion introduced by Stinson, Wei and Chen. The upper bound generalises and unifies several previously known bounds which apply in special cases, namely bounds on perfect hash families, frameproof codes, secure frameproof codes and separating hash families of small type.
2007
EPRINT
Interactive two-channel message authentication based on interactive-collision Resistant hash functions
Atefeh Mashatan Douglas R. Stinson
We propose an interactive message authentication protocol (IMAP) using two channels: an insecure broadband channel and an authenticated narrow-band channel. We consider the problem in the context of ad hoc networks, where it is assumed that there is neither a secret key shared among the two parties, nor a public-key infrastructure in place. The security of our IMAP is based on the existence of Interactive-Collision Resistant (ICR) hash functions, a new notion of hash function security. Our IMAP is based on the computational assumption that ICR hash functions exist. It performs better than message authentication protocols that are based on computational assumptions. That is, while achieving the same level of security, the amount of information sent over the authenticated channel in our IMAP is smaller than the most secure IMAP and Non-interactive Message Authentication Protocol (NIMAP) in the literature. In other words, if we send the same amount of information over the authenticated channel, we can allow much stronger adversaries compared to the existing protocols in the literature. Moreover, our IMAP benefits from a simple structure and works under fewer security assumptions compared to other IMAPs in the literature. The efficient and easy-to-use structure of our IMAP makes it very practical in real world ad hoc network scenarios.
2007
EPRINT
Generalized mix functions and orthogonal equitable rectangles
Douglas R. Stinson
Ristenpart and Rogaway defined "mix" functions, which are used to mix inputs from two sets of equal size, and produce outputs from the same two sets, in an optimal way. These functions have a cryptographic application in the context of extending the domain of a block cipher. It was observed that mix functions could be constructed from orthogonal latin squares. In this paper, we give a simple, scalable construction for mix functions. We also consider a generalization of mix functions, in which the two sets need not be of equal size. These generalized mix functions turn out to be equivalent to an interesting type of combinatorial design which has not previously been studied. We term these "orthogonal equitable rectangles" and we construct them for all possible parameter situations, with a small number of exceptions and possible exceptions.
2007
EPRINT
The Effectiveness of Receipt-Based Attacks on ThreeBallot
Kevin Henry Douglas R. Stinson Jiayuan Sui
The ThreeBallot voting system is an end-to-end (E2E) voter-verifiable voting system. Each voter fills out three ballots according to a few simple rules and takes a copy of one of them home as a receipt for verification purposes. All ballots are posted on a public bulletin board so that any voter may verify the result. In this paper we investigate the effectiveness of attacks using the voter's receipt and the bulletin board. We determine thresholds for when the voter's vote can be reconstructed from a receipt, and when a coercer can effectively verify if a voter followed instructions by looking for prespecified patterns on the bulletin board. Combining these two results allows us to determine safe ballot sizes that resist known attacks. We also generalize a previous observation that an individual receipt can leak information about a voter's choices.
2007
EPRINT
A Critical Analysis and Improvement of AACS Drive-Host Authentication
Jiayuan Sui Douglas R. Stinson
This paper presents a critical analysis of the AACS drive-host authentication scheme. A few weaknesses are identified which could lead to various attacks on the scheme. In particular, we observe that the scheme is susceptible to unknown key-share and man-in-the-middle attacks. Modifications of the scheme are suggested in order to provide better security. A proof of security of the modified scheme is also presented. The modified scheme achieves better efficiency than the original scheme.
2007
JOFC
2006
EPRINT
Multicollision Attacks on some Generalized Sequential Hash Functions
M. Nandi D. R. Stinson
A multicollision for a function is a set of inputs whose outputs are all identical. A. Joux showed multicollision attacks on the classical iterated hash function. He also showed how these multicollision attacks can be used to get a collision attack on a concatenated hash function. In this paper, we study multicollision attacks in a more general class of hash functions which we term ``generalized sequential hash functions''. We show that multicollision attacks exist for this class of hash functions provided that every message block is used at most twice in the computation of the message digest.
2006
EPRINT
Noninteractive two-channel message authentication based on hybrid-collision resistant hash functions
Atefeh Mashatan Douglas R. Stinson
We consider the problem of non-interactive message authentication using two channels: an insecure broadband channel and an authenticated narrow-band channel. This problem has been considered in the context of ad hoc networks, where it is assumed that there is neither a secret key shared among the two parties, nor a public-key infrastructure in place. We present a formal model for protocols of this type, along with a new protocol which is as efficient as the best previous protocols. The security of our protocol is based on a new property of hash functions that we introduce, which we name ``hybrid-collision resistance''.
2006
EPRINT
An Efficient and Secure Two-flow Zero-Knowledge Identification Protocol
D.R. Stinson J. Wu
In this paper, we propose a new zero-knowledge identification protocol. While the protocol consists of only two message flows, it does not rely on any underlying signature or encryption scheme. Its zero-knowledge property is preserved under concurrent composition and reset settings. It is secure under the strongest attack model which incorporates concurrent attacks, active-intruder attacks and reset attacks. Meanwhile its performance in computation and communication is close to that of the most efficient identification protocols not based on signature or encryption systems, most of which are insecure in this strong attack model.
2006
EPRINT
Unconditionally secure chaffing and winnowing with short authentication tags
D. R. Stinson
Rivest proposed the idea of a chaffing-and-winnowing scheme, in which confidentiality is achieved through the use of an authentication code. Thus it would still be possible to have confidential communications even if conventional encryption schemes were outlawed. Hanaoka et al. constructed unconditionally secure chaffing-and-winnowing schemes which achieve perfect secrecy in the sense of Shannon. Their schemes are constructed from unconditionally secure authentication codes. In this paper, we construct unconditionally secure chaffing-and-winnowing schemes from unconditionally secure authentication codes in which the authentication tags are very short. This could be a desirable feature, because certain types of unconditionally secure authentication codes can provide perfect secrecy if the length of an authentication tag is at least as long as the length of the plaintext. The use of such a code might be prohibited if encryption schemes are made illegal, so it is of interest to construct chaffing-and-winnowing schemes based on "short'' authentication tags.
2004
EPRINT
Multicollision Attacks on Generalized Hash Functions
M. Nandi D. R. Stinson
In a recent paper in crypto-04, A. Joux showed a multicollision attacks on the classical iterated hash function. He also showed how the multicollision attack can be used to get a collision attack on the concatenated hash function. In this paper we have shown that the multicollision attacks exist in a general class of sequential or tree based hash functions even if message blocks are used twice unlike the classical hash function.
2002
ASIACRYPT
2002
JOFC
2001
EPRINT
Some observations on the theory of cryptographic hash functions
D.R. Stinson
In this paper, we study several issues related to the notion of ``secure'' hash functions. Several necessary conditions are considered, as well as a popular sufficient condition (the so-called random oracle model). We study the security of various problems that are motivated by the notion of a secure hash function. These problems are analyzed in the random oracle model, and we prove that the obvious trivial algorithms are optimal. As well, we look closely at reductions between various problems. In particular, we consider the important question ``does preimage resistance imply collision resistance?''. Finally, we study the relationship of the security of hash functions built using the Merkle-Damgard construction to the security of the underlying compression function.
2001
EPRINT
Slope packings and coverings, and generic algorithms for the discrete logarithm problem
We consider the set of slopes of lines formed by joining all pairs of points in some subset S of a Desarguesian affine plane of prime order, p. If all the slopes are distinct and non-infinite, we have a slope packing; if every possible non-infinite slope occurs, then we have a slope covering. We review and unify some results on these problems that can be derived from the study of Sidon sets and sum covers. Then we report some computational results we have obtained for small values of p. Finally, we point out some connections between slope packings and coverings and generic algorithms for the discrete logarithm problem in prime order (sub)groups. Our results provide a combinatorial characterization of such algorithms, in the sense that any generic algorithm implies the existence of a certain slope packing or covering, and conversely.
2001
JOFC
2000
EPRINT
Combinatorial Properties of Frameproof and Traceability Codes
J.N. Staddon D.R. Stinson R. Wei
In order to protect copyrighted material, codes may be embedded in the content or codes may be associated with the keys used to recover the content. Codes can offer protection by providing some form of traceability for pirated data. Several researchers have studied different notions of traceability and related concepts in recent years. "Strong" versions of traceability allow at least one member of a coalition that constructs a "pirate decoder" to be traced. Weaker versions of this concept ensure that no coalition can "frame" a disjoint user or group of users. All these concepts can be formulated as codes having certain combinatorial properties. In this paper, we study the relationships between the various notions, and we discuss equivalent formulations using structures such as perfect hash families. We use methods from combinatorics and coding theory to provide bounds (necessary conditions) and constructions (sufficient conditions) for the objects of interest.
2000
EPRINT
Constructions and Bounds for Unconditionally Secure Commitment Schemes
C. Blundo B. Masucci D.R. Stinson R. Wei
Commitment schemes have been extensively studied since they were introduced by Blum in 1982. Rivest recently showed how to construct unconditionally secure commitment schemes, assuming the existence of a trusted initializer. In this paper, we present a formal mathematical model for such schemes, and analyze their binding and concealing properties. In particular, we show that such schemes cannot be perfectly concealing: there is necessarily a small probability that Alice can cheat Bob by committing to one value but later revealing a different value. We prove several bounds on Alice's cheating probability, and present constructions of schemes that achieve optimal cheating probabilities. We also show a close link between commitment schemes and the classical ``affine resolvable designs''.
1999
JOFC
1997
EUROCRYPT
1996
CRYPTO
1996
CRYPTO
1996
EPRINT
On the Contrast in Visual Cryptography Schemes
Carlo Blundo Alfredo De Santis Douglas R. Stinson
A visual cryptography scheme is a method to encode a secret image SI into shadow images called shares such that certain qualified subsets of shares enable the ``visual'' recovery of the secret image. The ``visual'' recovery consists of xeroxing the shares onto transparencies, and then stacking them. The shares of a qualified set will reveal the secret image without any cryptographic computation. In this paper we analyze the contrast of the reconstructed image in k out of n visual cryptography schemes. (In such a scheme any k shares will reveal the image, but no set of k-1 shares gives any information about the image.) In the case of 2 out of n threshold schemes we give a complete characterization of schemes having optimal contrast and minimum pixel expansion in terms of certain balanced incomplete block designs. In the case of k out of n threshold schemes with k>2 we obtain upper and lower bounds on the optimal contrast.
1995
JOFC
1995
JOFC
1994
CRYPTO
1994
EUROCRYPT
1992
CRYPTO
1992
EUROCRYPT
1992
JOFC
1991
CRYPTO
1991
CRYPTO
1990
CRYPTO
1990
JOFC
1988
CRYPTO
1988
EUROCRYPT
1988
JOFC
1988
JOFC
1987
CRYPTO
1987
CRYPTO
1986
CRYPTO

Program Committees

Eurocrypt 2011
Asiacrypt 2005
Eurocrypt 2005
Eurocrypt 2003
Crypto 2001
Crypto 2000
Crypto 1997
Eurocrypt 1995
Crypto 1993 (Program chair)
Crypto 1990