International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Jiangtao Li

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2010
EPRINT
A Pairing-Based DAA Scheme Further Reducing TPM Resources
Ernie Brickell Jiangtao Li
Direct Anonymous Attestation (DAA) is an anonymous signature scheme designed for anonymous attestation of a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) while preserving the privacy of the device owner. Since TPM has limited bandwidth and computational capability, one interesting feature of DAA is to split the signer role between two entities: a TPM and a host platform where the TPM is attached. Recently, Chen proposed a new DAA scheme that is more efficient than previous DAA schemes. In this paper, we construct a new DAA scheme requiring even fewer TPM resources. Our DAA scheme is about 5 times more efficient than Chen's scheme for the TPM implementation using the Barreto-Naehrig curves. In addition, our scheme requires much smaller size of software code that needs to be implemented in the TPM. This makes our DAA scheme ideal for the TPM implementation. Our DAA scheme is efficient and provably secure in the random oracle model under the strong Diffie-Hellman assumption and the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption.
2010
EPRINT
Key Exchange with Anonymous Authentication using DAA-SIGMA Protocol
Jesse Walker Jiangtao Li
Anonymous digital signatures such as Direct Anonymous Attestation (DAA) and group signatures have been a fundamental building block for anonymous entity authentication. In this paper, we show how to incorporate DAA schemes into a key exchange protocol between two entities to achieve anonymous authentication and to derive a shared key between them. We propose a modification to the SIGMA key exchange protocol used in the Internet Key Exchange (IKE) standards to support anonymous authentication using DAA. Our key exchange protocol can be also extended to support group signature schemes instead of DAA. We present a secure model for key exchange with anonymous authentication derived from of the Canetti-Krawczyk key-exchange security model. We formally prove that our DAA-SIGMA protocol is secure under our security model.
2009
EPRINT
Enhanced Privacy ID from Bilinear Pairing
Ernie Brickell Jiangtao Li
Enhanced Privacy ID (EPID) is a cryptographic scheme that enables the remote authentication of a hardware device while preserving the privacy of the device. EPID can be seen as a direct anonymous attestation scheme with enhanced revocation capabilities. In EPID, a device can be revoked if the private key embedded in the hardware device has been extracted and published widely so that the revocation manager finds the corrupted private key. In addition, the revocation manager can revoke a device based on the signatures the device has signed, if the private key of the device is not known. In this paper, we introduce a new security notion of EPID including the formal definitions of anonymity and unforgeability with revocation. We also give a construction of an EPID scheme from bilinear pairing. Our EPID scheme is efficient and provably secure in the random oracle model under the strong Diffie-Hellman assumption and the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption.
2008
EPRINT
Simplified Security Notions of Direct Anonymous Attestation and a Concrete Scheme from Pairings
Direct Anonymous Attestation (DAA) is a cryptographic mechanism that enables remote authentication of a user while preserving privacy under the user's control. The DAA scheme developed by Brickell, Camenisch, and Chen has been adopted by the Trust Computing Group (TCG) for remote anonymous attestation of Trusted Platform Module (TPM), a small hardware device with limited storage space and communication capability. In this paper, we provide two contributions to DAA. We first introduce simplified security notions of DAA including the formal definitions of user controlled anonymity and traceability. We then propose a new DAA scheme from elliptic curve cryptography and bilinear maps. The lengths of private keys and signatures in our scheme are much shorter than the lengths in the original DAA scheme, with a similar level of security and computational complexity. Our scheme builds upon the Camenisch-Lysyanskaya signature scheme and is efficient and provably secure in the random oracle model under the LRSW (stands for Lysyanskaya, Rivest, Sahai and Wolf) assumption and the decisional Bilinear Diffie-Hellman assumption.
2007
EPRINT
Enhanced Privacy ID: A Direct Anonymous Attestation Scheme with Enhanced Revocation Capabilities
Ernie Brickell Jiangtao Li
Direct Anonymous Attestation (DAA) is a scheme that enables the remote authentication of a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) while preserving the user's privacy. A TPM can prove to a remote party that it is a valid TPM without revealing its identity and without linkability. In the DAA scheme, a TPM can be revoked only if the DAA private key in the hardware has been extracted and published widely so that verifiers obtain the corrupted private key. If the unlinkability requirement is relaxed, a TPM suspected of being compromised can be revoked even if the private key is not known. However, with the full unlinkability requirement intact, if a TPM has been compromised but its private key has not been distributed to verifiers, the TPM cannot be revoked. Furthermore, a TPM cannot be revoked from the issuer, if the TPM is found to be compromised after the DAA issuing has occurred. In this paper, we present a new DAA scheme called Enhanced Privacy ID (EPID) scheme that addresses the above limitations. While still providing unlinkability, our scheme provides a method to revoke a TPM even if the TPM private key is unknown. This expanded revocation property makes the scheme useful for other applications such as for driver's license. Our EPID scheme is efficient and provably secure in the same security model as DAA, i.e. in the random oracle model under the strong RSA assumption and the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption.