International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Carsten Rolfes

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2017
CHES
How to Break Secure Boot on FPGA SoCs Through Malicious Hardware
Embedded IoT devices are often built upon large system on chip computing platforms running a significant stack of software. For certain computation-intensive operations such as signal processing or encryption and authentication of large data, chips with integrated FPGAs, FPGA SoCs, which provide high performance through configurable hardware designs, are used. In this contribution, we demonstrate how an FPGA hardware design can compromise the important secure boot process of the main software system to boot from a malicious network source instead of an authentic signed kernel image. This significant and new threat arises from the fact that the CPU and FPGA are connected to the same memory bus, so that FPGA hardware designs can interfere with secure boot routines on FPGA SoCs that are without any interruption on regular SoCs. An enabling factor is that integrated hardware designs are likely bought from external partners and there is a realistic lack of security review at the system integrators. This facilitates flaws or even unwanted functionality in such hardware designs. We perform a proof of concept on a Xilinx Zynq-7000 FPGA SoC, and the threat can be generalized to other devices. We also present as effective mitigation, an easy-to-review and re-usable wrapper module which prevents any unauthorized memory access by included hardware designs.
2008
EPRINT
Information Leakage of Flip-Flops in DPA-Resistant Logic Styles
This contribution discusses the information leakage of flip-flops for different DPA-resistant logic styles. We show that many of the proposed side-channel resistant logic styles still employ flip-flops that leak data-dependent information. Furthermore, we apply simple models for the leakage of masked flip-flops to design a new attack on circuits implemented using masked logic styles. Contrary to previous attacks on masked logic styles, our attack does not predict the mask bit and does not need detailed knowledge about the attacked device, e.g., the circuit layout. Moreover, our attack works even if all the load capacitances of the complementary logic signals are perfectly balanced and even if the PRNG is ideally unbiased. Finally, after performing the attack on DRSL, MDPL, and iMDPL circuits we show that single-bit masks do not influence the exploitability of the revealed leakage of the masked flip-flops.