International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Thorben Moos

Affiliation: Horst Görtz Institute for IT Security, Ruhr-Universität Bochum

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2019
TCHES
Glitch-Resistant Masking Revisited
Implementing the masking countermeasure in hardware is a delicate task. Various solutions have been proposed for this purpose over the last years: we focus on Threshold Implementations (TIs), Domain-Oriented Masking (DOM), the Unified Masking Approach (UMA) and Generic Low Latency Masking (GLM). The latter generally come with innovative ideas to cope with physical defaults such as glitches. Yet, and in contrast to the situation in software-oriented masking, these schemes have not been formally proven at arbitrary security orders and their composability properties were left unclear. So far, only a 2-cycle implementation of the seminal masking scheme by Ishai, Sahai and Wagner has been shown secure and composable in the robust probing model – a variation of the probing model aimed to capture physical defaults such as glitches – for any number of shares.In this paper, we argue that this lack of proofs for TIs, DOM, UMA and GLM makes the interpretation of their security guarantees difficult as the number of shares increases. For this purpose, we first put forward that the higher-order variants of all these schemes are affected by (local or composability) security flaws in the (robust) probing model, due to insufficient refreshing. We then show that composability and robustness against glitches cannot be analyzed independently. We finally detail how these abstract flaws translate into concrete (experimental) attacks, and discuss the additional constraints robust probing security implies on the need of registers. Despite not systematically leading to improved complexities at low security orders, e.g., with respect to the required number of measurements for a successful attack, we argue that these weaknesses provide a case for the need of security proofs in the robust probing model (or a similar abstraction) at higher security orders.
2019
TCHES
Static Power SCA of Sub-100 nm CMOS ASICs and the Insecurity of Masking Schemes in Low-Noise Environments
Thorben Moos
Semiconductor technology scaling faced tough engineering challenges while moving towards and beyond the deep sub-micron range. One of the most demanding issues, limiting the shrinkage process until the present day, is the difficulty to control the leakage currents in nanometer-scaled field-effect transistors. Previous articles have shown that this source of energy dissipation, at least in case of digital CMOS logic, can successfully be exploited as a side-channel to recover the secrets of cryptographic implementations. In this work, we present the first fair technology comparison with respect to static power side-channel measurements on real silicon and demonstrate that the effect of down-scaling on the potency of this security threat is huge. To this end, we designed two ASICs in sub-100nm CMOS nodes (90 nm, 65 nm) and got them fabricated by one of the leading foundries. Our experiments, which we performed at different operating conditions, show consistently that the ASIC technology with the smaller minimum feature size (65 nm) indeed exhibits substantially more informative leakages (factor of ~10) than the 90nm one, even though all targeted instances have been derived from identical RTL code. However, the contribution of this work extends well beyond a mere technology comparison. With respect to the real-world impact of static power attacks, we present the first realistic scenarios that allow to perform a static power side-channel analysis (including noise reduction) without requiring control over the clock signal of the target. Furthermore, as a follow-up to some proof-of-concept work indicating the vulnerability of masking schemes to static powerattacks, we perform a detailed study on how the reduction of the noise level in static leakage measurements affects the security provided by masked implementations. As a result of this study, we do not only find out that the threat for masking schemes is indeed real, but also that common leakage assessment techniques, such as the Welch’s t-test, together with essentially any moment-based analysis of the leakage traces, is simply not sufficient in low-noise contexts. In fact, we are able to show that either a conversion (resp. compression) of the leakage order or the recently proposed X2 test need to be considered in assessment and attack to avoid false negatives.
2019
TCHES
Exploring the Effect of Device Aging on Static Power Analysis Attacks
Vulnerability of cryptographic devices to side-channel analysis attacks, and in particular power analysis attacks has been extensively studied in the recent years. Among them, static power analysis attacks have become relevant with moving towards smaller technology nodes for which the static power is comparable to the dynamic power of a chip, or even dominant in future technology generations. The magnitude of the static power of a chip depends on the physical characteristics of transistors (e.g., the dimensions) as well as operating conditions (e.g., the temperature) and the electrical specifications such as the threshold voltage. In fact, the electrical specifications of transistors deviate from their originally intended ones during device lifetime due to aging mechanisms. Although device aging has been extensively investigated from reliability point of view, the impact of aging on the security of devices, and in particular on the vulnerability of devices to power analysis attacks are yet to be considered.This paper fills the gap and investigates how device aging can affect the susceptibility of a chip exposed to static power analysis attacks. To this end, we conduct both, simulation and practical experiments on real silicon. The experimental results are extracted from a realization of the PRESENT cipher fabricated using a 65nm commercial standard cell library. The results show that the amount of exploitable leakage through the static power consumption as a side channel is reduced when the device is aged. This can be considered as a positive development which can (even slightly) harden such static power analysis attacks. Additionally, this result is of great interest to static power side-channel adversaries since state-of-the-art leakage current measurements are conducted over long time periods under increased working temperatures and supply voltages to amplify the exploitable information, which certainly fuels aging-related device degradation.