International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Amir Moradi

Affiliation: Florida Atlantic University, US

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2019
TCHES
Glitch-Resistant Masking Revisited
Implementing the masking countermeasure in hardware is a delicate task. Various solutions have been proposed for this purpose over the last years: we focus on Threshold Implementations (TIs), Domain-Oriented Masking (DOM), the Unified Masking Approach (UMA) and Generic Low Latency Masking (GLM). The latter generally come with innovative ideas to cope with physical defaults such as glitches. Yet, and in contrast to the situation in software-oriented masking, these schemes have not been formally proven at arbitrary security orders and their composability properties were left unclear. So far, only a 2-cycle implementation of the seminal masking scheme by Ishai, Sahai and Wagner has been shown secure and composable in the robust probing model – a variation of the probing model aimed to capture physical defaults such as glitches – for any number of shares.In this paper, we argue that this lack of proofs for TIs, DOM, UMA and GLM makes the interpretation of their security guarantees difficult as the number of shares increases. For this purpose, we first put forward that the higher-order variants of all these schemes are affected by (local or composability) security flaws in the (robust) probing model, due to insufficient refreshing. We then show that composability and robustness against glitches cannot be analyzed independently. We finally detail how these abstract flaws translate into concrete (experimental) attacks, and discuss the additional constraints robust probing security implies on the need of registers. Despite not systematically leading to improved complexities at low security orders, e.g., with respect to the required number of measurements for a successful attack, we argue that these weaknesses provide a case for the need of security proofs in the robust probing model (or a similar abstraction) at higher security orders.
2019
TOSC
CRAFT: Lightweight Tweakable Block Cipher with Efficient Protection Against DFA Attacks
Traditionally, countermeasures against physical attacks are integrated into the implementation of cryptographic primitives after the algorithms have been designed for achieving a certain level of cryptanalytic security. This picture has been changed by the introduction of PICARO, ZORRO, and FIDES, where efficient protection against Side-Channel Analysis (SCA) attacks has been considered in their design. In this work we present the tweakable block cipher CRAFT: the efficient protection of its implementations against Differential Fault Analysis (DFA) attacks has been one of the main design criteria, while we provide strong bounds for its security in the related-tweak model. Considering the area footprint of round-based hardware implementations, CRAFT outperforms the other lightweight ciphers with the same state and key size. This holds not only for unprotected implementations but also when fault-detection facilities, side-channel protection, and their combination are integrated into the implementation. In addition to supporting a 64-bit tweak, CRAFT has the additional property that the circuit realizing the encryption can support the decryption functionality as well with very little area overhead.
2019
TCHES
Exploring the Effect of Device Aging on Static Power Analysis Attacks
Vulnerability of cryptographic devices to side-channel analysis attacks, and in particular power analysis attacks has been extensively studied in the recent years. Among them, static power analysis attacks have become relevant with moving towards smaller technology nodes for which the static power is comparable to the dynamic power of a chip, or even dominant in future technology generations. The magnitude of the static power of a chip depends on the physical characteristics of transistors (e.g., the dimensions) as well as operating conditions (e.g., the temperature) and the electrical specifications such as the threshold voltage. In fact, the electrical specifications of transistors deviate from their originally intended ones during device lifetime due to aging mechanisms. Although device aging has been extensively investigated from reliability point of view, the impact of aging on the security of devices, and in particular on the vulnerability of devices to power analysis attacks are yet to be considered.This paper fills the gap and investigates how device aging can affect the susceptibility of a chip exposed to static power analysis attacks. To this end, we conduct both, simulation and practical experiments on real silicon. The experimental results are extracted from a realization of the PRESENT cipher fabricated using a 65nm commercial standard cell library. The results show that the amount of exploitable leakage through the static power consumption as a side channel is reduced when the device is aged. This can be considered as a positive development which can (even slightly) harden such static power analysis attacks. Additionally, this result is of great interest to static power side-channel adversaries since state-of-the-art leakage current measurements are conducted over long time periods under increased working temperatures and supply voltages to amplify the exploitable information, which certainly fuels aging-related device degradation.
2018
TCHES
Hardware Masking, Revisited 📺
MaskingHardware masking schemes have shown many advances in the past few years. Through a series of publications their implementation cost has dropped significantly and flaws have been fixed where present. Despite these advancements it seems that a limit has been reached when implementing masking schemes on FPGA platforms. Indeed, even with a correct transition from the masking scheme to the masking realization (i.e., when the implementation is not buggy) it has been shown that the implementation can still exhibit unexpected leakage, e.g., through variations in placement and routing. In this work, we show that the reason for such unexpected leakages is the violation of an underlying assumption made by all masking schemes, i.e., that the leakage of the circuit is a linear sum of leakages associated to each share. In addition to the theory of VLSI which supports our claim, we perform a wide range of experiments based on an FPGA) to find out under what circumstances this causes a masked hardware implementation to show undesirable leakage. We further illustrate case studies, where publicly-known secure designs exhibit first-order leakage when being operated at certain conditions.
2018
TCHES
Leakage Detection with the x2-Test 📺
We describe how Pearson’s χ2-test can be used as a natural complement to Welch’s t-test for black box leakage detection. In particular, we show that by using these two tests in combination, we can mitigate some of the limitations due to the moment-based nature of existing detection techniques based on Welch’s t-test (e.g., for the evaluation of higher-order masked implementations with insufficient noise). We also show that Pearson’s χ2-test is naturally suited to analyze threshold implementations with information lying in multiple statistical moments, and can be easily extended to a distinguisher for key recovery attacks. As a result, we believe the proposed test and methodology are interesting complementary ingredients of the side-channel evaluation toolbox, for black box leakage detection and non-profiled attacks, and as a preliminary before more demanding advanced analyses.
2018
TCHES
Spin Me Right Round Rotational Symmetry for FPGA-Specific AES
The effort in reducing the area of AES implementations has largely been focused on Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) in which a tower field construction leads to a small design of the AES S-box. In contrast, a naïve implementation of the AES S-box has been the status-quo on Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). A similar discrepancy holds for masking schemes – a wellknown side-channel analysis countermeasure – which are commonly optimized to achieve minimal area in ASICs.In this paper we demonstrate a representation of the AES S-box exploiting rotational symmetry which leads to a 50% reduction of the area footprint on FPGA devices. We present new AES implementations which improve on the state of the art and explore various trade-offs between area and latency. For instance, at the cost of increasing 4.5 times the latency, one of our design variants requires 25% less look-up tables (LUTs) than the smallest known AES on Xilinx FPGAs by Sasdrich and Güneysu at ASAP 2016. We further explore the protection of such implementations against first-order side-channel analysis attacks. Targeting the small area footprint on FPGAs, we introduce a heuristic-based algorithm to find a masking of a given function with d + 1 shares. Its application to our new construction of the AES S-box allows us to introduce the smallest masked AES implementation on Xilinx FPGAs, to-date.
2017
ASIACRYPT
2017
CHES
Bit-Sliding: A Generic Technique for Bit-Serial Implementations of SPN-based Primitives
Area minimization is one of the main efficiency criterion for lightweight encryption primitives. While reducing the implementation data path is a natural strategy for achieving this goal, Substitution-Permutation Network (SPN) ciphers are usually hard to implement in a bit-serial way (1-bit data path). More generally, this is hard for any data path smaller than its Sbox size, since many scan flip-flops would be required for storage, which are more area-expensive than regular flip-flops.In this article, we propose the first strategy to obtain extremely small bit-serial ASIC implementations of SPN primitives. Our technique, which we call bit-sliding, is generic and offers many new interesting implementation trade-offs. It manages to minimize the area by reducing the data path to a single bit, while avoiding the use of many scan flip-flops.Following this general architecture, we could obtain the first bit-serial and the smallest implementation of AES-128 to date (1560 GE for encryption only, and 1738 GE for encryption and decryption with IBM 130 nm standard-cell library), greatly improving over the smallest known implementations (about 30% decrease), making AES-128 competitive to many ciphers specifically designed for lightweight cryptography. To exhibit the generality of our strategy, we also applied it to the PRESENT and SKINNY block ciphers, again offering the smallest implementations of these ciphers thus far, reaching an area as low as 1065 GE for a 64-bit block 128-bit key cipher. It is also to be noted that our bit-sliding seems to obtain very good power consumption figures, which makes this implementation strategy a good candidate for passive RFID tags.
2016
CRYPTO
2016
CRYPTO
2016
FSE
2016
CHES
2016
ASIACRYPT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
CHES
2015
CHES
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
CHES
2014
CHES
2013
CHES
2012
EUROCRYPT
2012
CHES
2011
EUROCRYPT
2011
CHES
2011
CHES
2011
JOFC
2010
EPRINT
Correlation-Enhanced Power Analysis Collision Attack
Side-channel based collision attacks are a mostly disregarded alternative to DPA for analyzing unprotected implementations. The advent of strong countermeasures, such as masking, has made further research in collision attacks seemingly in vain. In this work, we show that the principles of collision attacks can be adapted to efficiently break some masked hardware implementation of the AES which still have first-order leakage. The proposed attack breaks an AES implementation based on the corrected version of the masked S-box of Canright and Batina presented at ACNS 2008 which is supposed to be resistant against firstorder attacks. It requires only six times the number of traces necessary for breaking a comparable unprotected implementation. At the same time, the presented attack has minimal requirements on the abilities and knowledge of an adversary. The attack requires no detailed knowledge about the design, nor does it require a training phase.
2010
CHES
2008
EPRINT
Physical Cryptanalysis of KeeLoq Code Hopping Applications
KeeLoq remote keyless entry systems are widely used for access control purposes such as garage door openers for car anti-theft systems. We present the first successful differential power analysis attacks on numerous commercially available products employing KeeLoq code hopping. Our new techniques combine side-channel cryptanalysis with specific properties of the KeeLoq algorithm. They allow for efficiently revealing both the secret key of a remote transmitter and the manufacturer key stored in a receiver. As a result, a remote control can be cloned from only ten power traces, allowing for a practical key recovery in few minutes. Once knowing the manufacturer key, we demonstrate how to disclose the secret key of a remote control and replicate it from a distance, just by eavesdropping at most two messages. This key-cloning without physical access to the device has serious real-world security implications. Finally, we mount a denial-of-service attack on a KeeLoq access control system. All the proposed attacks have been verified on several commercial KeeLoq products.
2008
EPRINT
Secure Adiabatic Logic: a Low-Energy DPA-Resistant Logic Style
Mehrdad Khatir Amir Moradi
The charge recovery logic families have been designed several years ago not in order to eliminate the side-channel leakage but to reduce the power consumption. However, in this article we present a new charge recovery logic style not only to gain high energy efficiency but also to achieve the resistance against side-channel attacks (SDA) especially against differential power analysis (DPA) attacks. Simulation results show a significant improvement in DPA-resistance level as well as in power consumption reduction in comparison with DPA-resistant logic styles proposed so far.
2008
EPRINT
Information Leakage of Flip-Flops in DPA-Resistant Logic Styles
This contribution discusses the information leakage of flip-flops for different DPA-resistant logic styles. We show that many of the proposed side-channel resistant logic styles still employ flip-flops that leak data-dependent information. Furthermore, we apply simple models for the leakage of masked flip-flops to design a new attack on circuits implemented using masked logic styles. Contrary to previous attacks on masked logic styles, our attack does not predict the mask bit and does not need detailed knowledge about the attacked device, e.g., the circuit layout. Moreover, our attack works even if all the load capacitances of the complementary logic signals are perfectly balanced and even if the PRNG is ideally unbiased. Finally, after performing the attack on DRSL, MDPL, and iMDPL circuits we show that single-bit masks do not influence the exploitability of the revealed leakage of the masked flip-flops.
2008
EPRINT
Investigating the DPA-Resistance Property of Charge Recovery Logics
The threat of DPA attacks is of crucial importance when designing cryptographic hardware. As a result, several DPA countermeasures at the cell level have been proposed in the last years, but none of them offers perfect protection against DPA attacks. Moreover, all of these DPA-resistant logic styles increase the power consumption and the area consumption significantly. On the other hand, there are some logic styles which provide less power dissipation (so called charge recovery logic) that can be considered as a DPA countermeasure. In this article we examine them from the DPA-resistance point of view. As an example of charge recovery logic styles, 2N-2N2P is evaluated. It is shown that the usage of this logic style leads to an improvement of the DPA-resistance and at the same time reduces the energy consumption which make it especially suitable for pervasive devices. In fact, it is the first time that a proposed DPA-resistant logic style consumes less power than the corresponding standard CMOS circuit.
2008
CRYPTO
2006
CHES

Program Committees

CHES 2019
CHES 2018
CHES 2017
Asiacrypt 2017
FSE 2016
CHES 2016
Asiacrypt 2016
FSE 2015
CHES 2015