International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Patrick Longa

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2021
CRYPTO
The Cost to Break SIKE: A Comparative Hardware-Based Analysis with AES and SHA-3 📺
Patrick Longa Wen Wang Jakub Szefer
This work presents a detailed study of the classical security of the post-quantum supersingular isogeny key encapsulation (SIKE) protocol using a realistic budget-based cost model that considers the actual computing and memory costs that are needed for cryptanalysis. In this effort, we design especially-tailored hardware accelerators for the time-critical multiplication and isogeny computations that we use to model an ASIC-powered instance of the van Oorschot-Wiener (vOW) parallel collision search algorithm. We then extend the analysis to AES and SHA-3 in the context of the NIST post-quantum cryptography standardization process to carry out a parameter analysis based on our cost model. This analysis, together with the state-of-the-art quantum security analysis of SIKE, indicates that the current SIKE parameters offer higher practical security than currently believed, closing an open issue on the suitability of the parameters to match NIST's security levels. In addition, we explore the possibility of using significantly smaller primes to enable more efficient and compact implementations with reduced bandwidth. Our improved cost model and analysis can be applied to other cryptographic settings and primitives, and can have implications for other post-quantum candidates in the NIST process.
2020
TCHES
A Compact and Scalable Hardware/Software Co-design of SIKE 📺
We present efficient and compact hardware/software co-design implementations of the Supersingular Isogeny Key Encapsulation (SIKE) protocol on field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). In order to be better equipped for different post-quantum scenarios, our architectures were designed to feature high-flexibility by covering all the currently available parameter sets and with support for primes up to 1016 bits. In particular, any of the current SIKE parameters equivalent to the post-quantum security of AES-128/192/256 and SHA3-256 can be selected and run on-the-fly. This security scalability property, together with the small footprint and efficiency of our architectures, makes them ideal for embedded applications in a post-quantum world. In addition, the proposed implementations exhibit regular, constant-time execution, which provides protection against timing and simple sidechannel attacks. Our results demonstrate that supersingular isogeny-based primitives such as SIDH and SIKE can indeed be deployed for embedded applications featuring competitive performance. For example, our smallest architecture based on a 128-bit MAC unit takes only 3415 slices, 21 BRAMs and 57 DSPs on a Virtex 7 690T and can perform key generation, encapsulation and decapsulation in 14.4, 24.4 and 26.0 milliseconds for SIKEp434 and in 52.3, 86.4 and 93.2 milliseconds for SIKEp751, respectively.
2020
PKC
Improved Classical Cryptanalysis of SIKE in Practice 📺
The main contribution of this work is an optimized implementation of the van Oorschot-Wiener (vOW) parallel collision finding algorithm. As is typical for cryptanalysis against conjectured hard problems (e. g. factoring or discrete logarithms), challenges can arise in the implementation that are not captured in the theory, making the performance of the algorithm in practice a crucial element of estimating security. We present a number of novel improvements, both to generic instantiations of the vOW algorithm finding collisions in arbitrary functions, and to its instantiation in the context of the supersingular isogeny key encapsulation (SIKE) protocol, that culminate in an improved classical cryptanalysis of the computational supersingular isogeny (CSSI) problem. In particular, we present a scalable implementation that can be applied to the Round-2 parameter sets of SIKE that can be used to give confidence in their security levels.
2020
TCHES
Parameterized Hardware Accelerators for Lattice-Based Cryptography and Their Application to the HW/SW Co-Design of qTESLA 📺
This paper presents a set of efficient and parameterized hardware accelerators that target post-quantum lattice-based cryptographic schemes, including a versatile cSHAKE core, a binary-search CDT-based Gaussian sampler, and a pipelined NTT-based polynomial multiplier, among others. Unlike much of prior work, the accelerators are fully open-sourced, are designed to be constant-time, and can be parameterized at compile-time to support different parameters without the need for re-writing the hardware implementation. These flexible, publicly-available accelerators are leveraged to demonstrate the first hardware-software co-design using RISC-V of the post-quantum lattice-based signature scheme qTESLA with provably secure parameters. In particular, this work demonstrates that the NIST’s Round 2 level 1 and level 3 qTESLA variants achieve over a 40-100x speedup for key generation, about a 10x speedup for signing, and about a 16x speedup for verification, compared to the baseline RISC-V software-only implementation. For instance, this corresponds to execution in 7.7, 34.4, and 7.8 milliseconds for key generation, signing, and verification, respectively, for qTESLA’s level 1 parameter set on an Artix-7 FPGA, demonstrating the feasibility of the scheme for embedded applications.
2018
TCHES
SIDH on ARM: Faster Modular Multiplications for Faster Post-Quantum Supersingular Isogeny Key Exchange
Hwajeong Seo Zhe Liu Patrick Longa Zhi Hu
We present high-speed implementations of the post-quantum supersingular isogeny Diffie-Hellman key exchange (SIDH) and the supersingular isogeny key encapsulation (SIKE) protocols for 32-bit ARMv7-A processors with NEON support. The high performance of our implementations is mainly due to carefully optimized multiprecision and modular arithmetic that finely integrates both ARM and NEON instructions in order to reduce the number of pipeline stalls and memory accesses, and a new Montgomery reduction technique that combines the use of the UMAAL instruction with a variant of the hybrid-scanning approach. In addition, we present efficient implementations of SIDH and SIKE for 64-bit ARMv8-A processors, based on a high-speed Montgomery multiplication that leverages the power of 64-bit instructions. Our experimental results consolidate the practicality of supersingular isogeny-based protocols for many real-world applications. For example, a full key-exchange execution of SIDHp503 is performed in about 176 million cycles on an ARM Cortex-A15 from the ARMv7-A family (i.e., 88 milliseconds @2.0GHz). On an ARM Cortex-A72 from the ARMv8-A family, the same operation can be carried out in about 90 million cycles (i.e., 45 milliseconds @1.992GHz). All our software is protected against timing and cache attacks. The techniques for modular multiplication presented in this work have broad applications to other cryptographic schemes.
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
CHES
Four$\mathbb {Q}$ on Embedded Devices with Strong Countermeasures Against Side-Channel Attacks
This work deals with the energy-efficient, high-speed and high-security implementation of elliptic curve scalar multiplication and elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman (ECDH) key exchange on embedded devices using Four$$\mathbb {Q}$$ and incorporating strong countermeasures to thwart a wide variety of side-channel attacks. First, we set new speed records for constant-time curve-based scalar multiplication and DH key exchange at the 128-bit security level with implementations targeting 8, 16 and 32-bit microcontrollers. For example, our software computes a static ECDH shared secret in $$\sim $$6.9 million cycles (or 0.86 s @8 MHz) on a low-power 8-bit AVR microcontroller which, compared to the fastest Curve25519 and genus-2 Kummer implementations on the same platform, offers 2$$\times $$ and 1.4$$\times $$ speedups, respectively. Similarly, it computes the same operation in $$\sim $$496 thousand cycles on a 32-bit ARM Cortex-M4 microcontroller, achieving a factor-2.9 speedup when compared to the fastest Curve25519 implementation targeting the same platform. Second, we engineer a set of side-channel countermeasures taking advantage of Four$$\mathbb {Q}$$’s rich arithmetic and propose a secure implementation that offers protection against a wide range of sophisticated side-channel attacks. Finally, we perform a differential power analysis evaluation of our software running on an ARM Cortex-M4, and report that no leakage was detected with up to 10 million traces. These results demonstrate the potential of deploying Four$$\mathbb {Q}$$ on low-power applications such as protocols for IoT.
2016
CRYPTO
2016
CHES
2015
ASIACRYPT
2014
JOFC
2012
ASIACRYPT
2011
EUROCRYPT
2010
CHES
2009
PKC
2008
PKC

Program Committees

CHES 2021
CHES 2019
CHES 2018