International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Dominique Schröder

Affiliation: Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2019
PKC
Efficient Invisible and Unlinkable Sanitizable Signatures
Sanitizable signatures allow designated parties (the sanitizers) to apply arbitrary modifications to some restricted parts of signed messages. A secure scheme should not only be unforgeable, but also protect privacy and hold both the signer and the sanitizer accountable. Two important security properties that are seemingly difficult to achieve simultaneously and efficiently are invisibility and unlinkability. While invisibility ensures that the admissible modifications are hidden from external parties, unlinkability says that sanitized signatures cannot be linked to their sources. Achieving both properties simultaneously is crucial for applications where sensitive personal data is signed with respect to data-dependent admissible modifications. The existence of an efficient construction achieving both properties was recently posed as an open question by Camenisch et al. (PKC’17). In this work, we propose a solution to this problem with a two-step construction. First, we construct (non-accountable) invisible and unlinkable sanitizable signatures from signatures on equivalence classes and other basic primitives. Second, we put forth a generic transformation using verifiable ring signatures to turn any non-accountable sanitizable signature into an accountable one while preserving all other properties. When instantiating in the generic group and random oracle model, the efficiency of our construction is comparable to that of prior constructions, while providing stronger security guarantees.
2019
JOFC
(Efficient) Universally Composable Oblivious Transfer Using a Minimal Number of Stateless Tokens
We continue the line of work initiated by Katz (Eurocrypt 2007) on using tamper-proof hardware tokens for universally composable secure computation. As our main result, we show an oblivious-transfer (OT) protocol in which two parties each create and transfer a single, stateless token and can then run an unbounded number of OTs. We also show a more efficient protocol, based only on standard symmetric-key primitives (block ciphers and collision-resistant hash functions), that can be used if a bounded number of OTs suffice. Motivated by this result, we investigate the number of stateless tokens needed for universally composable OT. We prove that our protocol is optimal in this regard for constructions making black-box use of the tokens (in a sense we define). We also show that nonblack-box techniques can be used to obtain a construction using only a single stateless token.
2018
ASIACRYPT
Homomorphic Secret Sharing for Low Degree Polynomials
Russell W. F. Lai Giulio Malavolta Dominique Schröder
Homomorphic secret sharing (HSS) allows n clients to secret-share data to m servers, who can then homomorphically evaluate public functions over the shares. A natural application is outsourced computation over private data. In this work, we present the first plain-model homomorphic secret sharing scheme that supports the evaluation of polynomials with degree higher than 2. Our construction relies on any degree-k (multi-key) homomorphic encryption scheme and can evaluate degree-$$\left( (k+1)m -1 \right) $$ polynomials, for any polynomial number of inputs n and any sub-logarithmic (in the security parameter) number of servers m. At the heart of our work is a series of combinatorial arguments on how a polynomial can be split into several low-degree polynomials over the shares of the inputs, which we believe is of independent interest.
2017
ASIACRYPT
2017
JOFC
2016
CRYPTO
2016
PKC
2016
PKC
2016
PKC
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
CRYPTO
2014
CRYPTO
2014
TCC
2014
ASIACRYPT
2012
TCC
2012
PKC
2011
TCC
2011
CRYPTO
2010
EPRINT
Generic Constructions for Verifiably Encrypted Signatures without Random Oracles or NIZKs
Markus Rückert Michael Schneider Dominique Schröder
Verifiably encrypted signature schemes (VES) allow a signer to encrypt his or her signature under the public key of a trusted third party, while maintaining public signature verifiability. With our work, we propose two generic constructions based on Merkle authentication trees that do not require non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs (NIZKs) for maintaining verifiability. Both are stateful and secure in the standard model. Furthermore, we extend the specification for VES, bringing it closer to real-world needs. We also argue that statefulness can be a feature in common business scenarios. Our constructions rely on the assumption that CPA (even slightly weaker) secure encryption, ``maskable'' CMA secure signatures, and collision resistant hash functions exist. ``Maskable'' means that a signature can be hidden in a verifiable way using a secret masking value. Unmasking the signature is hard without knowing the secret masking value. We show that our constructions can be instantiated with a broad range of efficient signature and encryption schemes, including two lattice-based primitives. Thus, VES schemes can be based on the hardness of worst-case lattice problems, making them secure against subexponential and quantum-computer attacks. Among others, we provide the first efficient pairing-free instantiation in the standard model.
2010
PKC
2010
PKC
2010
EUROCRYPT
2009
EPRINT
Security of Verifiably Encrypted Signatures
Markus Rückert Dominique Schröder
In a verifiably encrypted signature scheme, signers encrypt their signature under the public key of a trusted third party and prove that they did so correctly. The security properties are unforgeability and opacity. Unforgeability states that a malicious signer should not be able to forge verifiably encrypted signatures and opacity prevents extraction from an encrypted signature. This paper proposes two novel fundamental requirements for verifiably encrypted signatures, called \emph{extractability} and \emph{abuse-freeness}, and analyze its effects on the security model of Boneh et al. Extractability ensures that the trusted third party is always able to extract a valid signature from a valid verifiably encrypted signature and abuse-freeness guarantees that a malicious signer, who cooperates with the trusted party, is not able to forge a verifiably encrypted signature. We further show that both properties are not covered by the model of Boneh et al., introduced at Eurocrypt 2003.
2009
PKC
2009
PKC

Program Committees

Crypto 2019
Crypto 2016
PKC 2016
Eurocrypt 2015
PKC 2015
PKC 2012