International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Amos Beimel

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2021
CRYPTO
Quadratic Secret Sharing and Conditional Disclosure of Secrets 📺
There is a huge gap between the upper and lower bounds on the share size of secret-sharing schemes for arbitrary $n$-party access structures, and consistent with our current knowledge the optimal share size can be anywhere between polynomial in $n$ and exponential in $n$. For linear secret-sharing schemes, we know that the share size for almost all $n$-party access structures must be exponential in $n$. Furthermore, most constructions of efficient secret-sharing schemes are linear. We would like to study larger classes of secret-sharing schemes with two goals. On one hand, we want to prove lower bounds for larger classes of secret-sharing schemes, possibly shedding some light on the share size of general secret-sharing schemes. On the other hand, we want to construct efficient secret-sharing schemes for access structures that do not have efficient linear secret-sharing schemes. Given this motivation, Paskin-Cherniavsky and Radune (ITC'20) defined and studied a new class of secret-sharing schemes in which the shares are generated by applying degree-$d$ polynomials to the secret and some random field elements. The special case $d=1$ corresponds to linear and multi-linear secret-sharing schemes. We define and study two additional classes of polynomial secret-sharing schemes: (1) schemes in which for every authorized set the reconstruction of the secret is done using polynomials and (2) schemes in which both sharing and reconstruction are done by polynomials. For linear secret-sharing schemes, schemes with linear sharing and schemes with linear reconstruction are equivalent. We give evidence that for polynomial secret-sharing schemes, schemes with polynomial sharing are probably stronger than schemes with polynomial reconstruction. We also prove lower bounds on the share size for schemes with polynomial reconstruction. On the positive side, we provide constructions of secret-sharing schemes and conditional disclosure of secrets (CDS) protocols with quadratic sharing and reconstruction. We extend a construction of Liu et al. (CRYPTO'17) and construct optimal quadratic $k$-server CDS protocols for functions $f:[N]^k\rightarrow \set{0,1}$ with message size $O(N^{(k-1)/3})$. We show how to transform our quadratic $k$-server CDS protocol to a robust CDS protocol, and use the robust CDS protocol to construct quadratic secret-sharing schemes for arbitrary access structures with share size $O(2^{0.705n})$; this is better than the best known share size of $O(2^{0.7576n})$ for linear secret-sharing schemes and worse than the best known share size of $O(2^{0.585n})$ for general secret-sharing schemes.
2020
EUROCRYPT
Evolving Ramp Secret Sharing with a Small Gap 📺
Amos Beimel Hussien Othman
Evolving secret-sharing schemes, introduced by Komargodski, Naor, and Yogev (TCC 2016b), are secret-sharing schemes in which there is no a-priory upper bound on the number of parties that will participate. The parties arrive one by one and when a party arrives the dealer gives it a share; the dealer cannot update this share when other parties arrive. Motivated by the fact that when the number of parties is known, ramp secret-sharing schemes are more efficient than threshold secret-sharing schemes, we study evolving ramp secret-sharing schemes. Specifically, we study evolving $(b(j),g(j))$-ramp secret-sharing schemes, where $g,b: \NN\to \NN$ are non-decreasing functions. In such schemes, any set of parties that for some $j$ contains $g(j)$ parties from the first parties that arrive can reconstruct the secret, and any set such that for every $j$ contains less than $b(j)$ parties from the first $j$ parties that arrive cannot learn any information about the secret. We focus on the case that the gap is small, namely $g(j)-b(j)=j^{\beta}$ for $0<\beta<1$. We show that there is an evolving ramp secret-sharing scheme with gap $t^{\beta}$, in which the share size of the $j$-th party is $\tilde{O}(j^{4-\frac{1}{\log^2 {1/\beta}}})$. Furthermore, we show that our construction results in much better share size for fixed values of $\beta$, i.e., there is an evolving ramp secret-sharing scheme with gap $\sqrt{j}$, in which the share size of the $j$-th party is $\tilde{O}(j)$. Our construction should be compared to the best known evolving $g(j)$-threshold secret-sharing schemes (i.e., when $b(j)=g(j)-1$) in which the share size of the $j$-th party is $\tilde{O}(j^4)$. Thus, our construction offers a significant improvement for every constant $\beta$, showing that allowing a gap between the sizes of the authorized and unauthorized sets can reduce the share size. In addition, we present an evolving $(k/2,k)$-ramp secret-sharing scheme for a constant $k$ (which can be very big), where any set of parties of size at least $k$ can reconstruct the secret and any set of parties of size at most $k/2$ cannot learn any information about the secret. The share size of the $j$-th party in our construction is $O(\log k\log j)$. This is an improvement over the best known evolving $k$-threshold secret-sharing schemes in which the share size of the $j$-th party is $O(k\log j)$.
2020
TCC
The Share Size of Secret-Sharing Schemes for Almost All Access Structures and Graphs 📺
Amos Beimel Oriol Farràs
The share size of general secret-sharing schemes is poorly understood. The gap between the best known upper bound on the total share size per party of $2^{0.64n}$ (Applebaum et al., STOC 2020) and the best known lower bound of $\Omega(n/\log n)$ (Csirmaz, J. of Cryptology 1997) is huge (where $n$ is the number of parties in the scheme). To gain some understanding on this problem, we study the share size of secret-sharing schemes of almost all access structures, i.e., of almost all collections of authorized sets. This is motivated by the fact that in complexity, many times almost all objects are hardest (e.g., most Boolean functions require exponential size circuits). All previous constructions of secret-sharing schemes were for the worst access structures (i.e., all access structures) or for specific families of access structures. We prove upper bounds on the share size for almost all access structures. We combine results on almost all monotone Boolean functions (Korshunov, Probl. Kibern. 1981) and a construction of (Liu and Vaikuntanathan, STOC 2018) and conclude that almost all access structures have a secret-sharing scheme with share size $2^{\tilde{O}(\sqrt{n})}$. We also study graph secret-sharing schemes. In these schemes, the parties are vertices of a graph and a set can reconstruct the secret if and only if it contains an edge. Again, for this family there is a huge gap between the upper bounds -- $O(n/\log n)$ (Erd\"{o}s and Pyber, Discrete Mathematics 1997) -- and the lower bounds -- $\Omega(\log n)$ (van Dijk, Des. Codes Crypto. 1995). We show that for almost all graphs, the share size of each party is $n^{o(1)}$. This result is achieved by using robust 2-server conditional disclosure of secrets protocols, a new primitive introduced and constructed in (Applebaum et al., STOC 2020), and the fact that the size of the maximal independent set in a random graph is small. Finally, using robust conditional disclosure of secrets protocols, we improve the total share size for all very dense graphs.
2020
TCC
On the Round Complexity of the Shuffle Model 📺
The shuffle model of differential privacy [Bittau et al. SOSP 2017; Erlingsson et al. SODA 2019; Cheu et al. EUROCRYPT 2019] was proposed as a viable model for performing distributed differentially private computations. Informally, the model consists of an untrusted analyzer that receives messages sent by participating parties via a shuffle functionality, the latter potentially disassociates messages from their senders. Prior work focused on one-round differentially private shuffle model protocols, demonstrating that functionalities such as addition and histograms can be performed in this model with accuracy levels similar to that of the curator model of differential privacy, where the computation is performed by a fully trusted party. A model closely related to the shuffle model was presented in the seminal work of Ishai et al. on establishing cryptography from anonymous communication [FOCS 2006]. Focusing on the round complexity of the shuffle model, we ask in this work what can be computed in the shuffle model of differential privacy with two rounds. Ishai et al. showed how to use one round of the shuffle to establish secret keys between every two parties. Using this primitive to simulate a general secure multi-party protocol increases its round complexity by one. We show how two parties can use one round of the shuffle to send secret messages without having to first establish a secret key, hence retaining round complexity. Combining this primitive with the two-round semi-honest protocol of Applebaum, Brakerski, and Tsabary [TCC 2018], we obtain that every randomized functionality can be computed in the shuffle model with an honest majority, in merely two rounds. This includes any differentially private computation. We hence move to examine differentially private computations in the shuffle model that (i) do not require the assumption of an honest majority, or (ii) do not admit one-round protocols, even with an honest majority. For that, we introduce two computational tasks: common element, and nested common element with parameter $\alpha$. For the common element problem we show that for large enough input domains, no one-round differentially private shuffle protocol exists with constant message complexity and negligible $\delta$, whereas a two-round protocol exists where every party sends a single message in every round. For the nested common element we show that no one-round differentially private protocol exists for this problem with adversarial coalition size $\alpha n$. However, we show that it can be privately computed in two rounds against coalitions of size $cn$ for every $c < 1$. This yields a separation between one-round and two-round protocols. We further show a one-round protocol for the nested common element problem that is differentially private with coalitions of size smaller than $c n$ for all $0 < c < \alpha < 1 / 2$.
2020
JOFC
${\varvec{1/p}}$-Secure Multiparty Computation without an Honest Majority and the Best of Both Worlds
A protocol for computing a functionality is secure if an adversary in this protocol cannot cause more harm than in an ideal computation, where parties give their inputs to a trusted party that returns the output of the functionality to all parties. In particular, in the ideal model, such computation is fair—if the corrupted parties get the output, then the honest parties get the output. Cleve (STOC 1986) proved that, in general, fairness is not possible without an honest majority. To overcome this impossibility, Gordon and Katz (Eurocrypt 2010) suggested a relaxed definition—1/ p -secure computation—which guarantees partial fairness. For two parties, they constructed 1/ p -secure protocols for functionalities for which the size of either their domain or their range is polynomial (in the security parameter). Gordon and Katz ask whether their results can be extended to multiparty protocols. We study 1/ p -secure protocols in the multiparty setting for general functionalities. Our main result is constructions of 1/ p -secure protocols that are resilient against any number of corrupted parties provided that the number of parties is constant and the size of the range of the functionality is at most polynomial (in the security parameter $${n}$$ n ). If fewer than 2/3 of the parties are corrupted, the size of the domain of each party is constant, and the functionality is deterministic, then our protocols are efficient even when the number of parties is $$\log \log {n}$$ log log n . On the negative side, we show that when the number of parties is super-constant, 1/ p -secure protocols are not possible when the size of the domain of each party is polynomial. Thus, our feasibility results for 1/ p -secure computation are essentially tight. We further motivate our results by constructing protocols with stronger guarantees: If in the execution of the protocol there is a majority of honest parties, then our protocols provide full security. However, if only a minority of the parties are honest, then our protocols are 1/ p -secure. Thus, our protocols provide the best of both worlds, where the 1/ p -security is only a fall-back option if there is no honest majority.
2019
EUROCRYPT
Secret-Sharing Schemes for General and Uniform Access Structures 📺
A secret-sharing scheme allows some authorized sets of parties to reconstruct a secret; the collection of authorized sets is called the access structure. For over 30 years, it was known that any (monotone) collection of authorized sets can be realized by a secret-sharing scheme whose shares are of size $$2^{n-o(n)}$$ and until recently no better scheme was known. In a recent breakthrough, Liu and Vaikuntanathan (STOC 2018) have reduced the share size to $$O(2^{0.994n})$$. Our first contribution is improving the exponent of secret sharing down to 0.892. For the special case of linear secret-sharing schemes, we get an exponent of 0.942 (compared to 0.999 of Liu and Vaikuntanathan).Motivated by the construction of Liu and Vaikuntanathan, we study secret-sharing schemes for uniform access structures. An access structure is k-uniform if all sets of size larger than k are authorized, all sets of size smaller than k are unauthorized, and each set of size k can be either authorized or unauthorized. The construction of Liu and Vaikuntanathan starts from protocols for conditional disclosure of secrets, constructs secret-sharing schemes for uniform access structures from them, and combines these schemes in order to obtain secret-sharing schemes for general access structures. Our second contribution in this paper is constructions of secret-sharing schemes for uniform access structures. We achieve the following results:A secret-sharing scheme for k-uniform access structures for large secrets in which the share size is $$O(k^2)$$ times the size of the secret.A linear secret-sharing scheme for k-uniform access structures for a binary secret in which the share size is $$\tilde{O}(2^{h(k/n)n/2})$$ (where h is the binary entropy function). By counting arguments, this construction is optimal (up to polynomial factors).A secret-sharing scheme for k-uniform access structures for a binary secret in which the share size is $$2^{\tilde{O}(\sqrt{k \log n})}$$. Our third contribution is a construction of ad-hoc PSM protocols, i.e., PSM protocols in which only a subset of the parties will compute a function on their inputs. This result is based on ideas we used in the construction of secret-sharing schemes for k-uniform access structures for a binary secret.
2018
EUROCRYPT
2018
ASIACRYPT
Optimal Linear Multiparty Conditional Disclosure of Secrets Protocols
Amos Beimel Naty Peter
In a k-party CDS protocol, each party sends one message to a referee (without seeing the other messages) such that the referee will learn a secret held by the parties if and only if the inputs of the parties satisfy some condition (e.g., if the inputs are all equal). This simple primitive is used to construct attribute based encryption, symmetrically-private information retrieval, priced oblivious transfer, and secret-sharing schemes for any access structure. Motivated by these applications, CDS protocols have been recently studied in many papers.In this work, we study linear CDS protocols, where each of the messages of the parties is a linear function of the secret and random elements taken from some finite field. Linearity is an important property of CDS protocols as many applications of CDS protocols required it.Our main result is a construction of linear k-party CDS protocols for an arbitrary function $$f:[N]^{k}\rightarrow \left\{ 0,1 \right\} $$ with messages of size $$O(N^{(k-1)/2})$$ (a similar result was independently and in parallel proven by Liu et al. [27]). By a lower bound of Beimel et al. [TCC 2017], this message size is optimal. We also consider functions with few inputs that return 1, and design more efficient CDS protocols for them.CDS protocols can be used to construct secret-sharing schemes for uniform access structures, where for some k all sets of size less than k are unauthorized, all sets of size greater than k are authorized, and each set of size k can be either authorized or unauthorized. We show that our results imply that every k-uniform access structure with n parties can be realized by a linear secret-sharing scheme with share size $$\min \left\{ (O(n/k))^{(k-1)/2},O(n \cdot 2^{n/2}) \right\} $$. Furthermore, the linear k-party CDS protocol with messages of size $$O(N^{(k-1)/2})$$ was recently used by Liu and Vaikuntanathan [STOC 2018] to construct a linear secret-sharing scheme with share size $$O(2^{0.999n})$$ for any n-party access structure.
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
TCC
2016
JOFC
2015
JOFC
2015
TCC
2014
CRYPTO
2014
TCC
2014
TCC
2012
CRYPTO
2011
CRYPTO
2010
TCC
2010
JOFC
2010
CRYPTO
2009
TCC
2008
TCC
2008
CRYPTO
2007
CRYPTO
2007
TCC
2007
TCC
2007
JOFC
2006
TCC
2005
TCC
2004
TCC
2004
JOFC
2003
JOFC
2001
EPRINT
On the Power of Nonlinear Secret-Sharing
Amos Beimel Yuval Ishai
A secret-sharing scheme enables a dealer to distribute a secret among n parties such that only some predefined authorized sets of parties will be able to reconstruct the secret from their shares. The (monotone) collection of authorized sets is called an access structure, and is freely identified with its characteristic monotone function f:{0,1}^n --> {0,1}. A family of secret-sharing schemes is called efficient if the total length of the n shares is polynomial in n. Most previously known secret-sharing schemes belonged to a class of linear schemes, whose complexity coincides with the monotone span program size of their access structure. Prior to this work there was no evidence that nonlinear schemes can be significantly more efficient than linear schemes, and in particular there were no candidates for schemes efficiently realizing access structures which do not lie in NC. The main contribution of this work is the construction of two efficient nonlinear schemes: (1) A scheme with perfect privacy whose access structure is conjectured not to lie in NC; (2) A scheme with statistical privacy whose access structure is conjectured not to lie in P/poly. Another contribution is the study of a class of nonlinear schemes, termed quasi-linear schemes, obtained by composing linear schemes over different fields. We show that while these schemes are possibly (super-polynomially) more powerful than linear schemes, they cannot efficiently realize access structures outside NC.
2000
CRYPTO
1999
CRYPTO
1995
CRYPTO
1993
CRYPTO
1992
CRYPTO

Program Committees

Asiacrypt 2020
Eurocrypt 2019
TCC 2018 (Program chair)
TCC 2018
TCC 2016
TCC 2014
TCC 2012
TCC 2010
Crypto 2010
Crypto 2007
PKC 2006
TCC 2005
Crypto 2005