International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Yuval Ishai

Affiliation: Technion, Israel, and UCLA, USA

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2019
CRYPTO
Cryptographic Sensing
Is it possible to measure a physical object in a way that makes the measurement signals unintelligible to an external observer? Alternatively, can one learn a natural concept by using a contrived training set that makes the labeled examples useless without the line of thought that has led to their choice? We initiate a study of “cryptographic sensing” problems of this type, presenting definitions, positive and negative results, and directions for further research.
2019
CRYPTO
Unconditionally Secure Computation Against Low-Complexity Leakage
We consider the problem of constructing leakage-resilient circuit compilers that are secure against global leakage functions with bounded output length. By global, we mean that the leakage can depend on all circuit wires and output a low-complexity function (represented as a multi-output Boolean circuit) applied on these wires. In this work, we design compilers both in the stateless (a.k.a. single-shot leakage) setting and the stateful (a.k.a. continuous leakage) setting that are unconditionally secure against $$\mathsf {AC}^0$$ leakage and similar low-complexity classes.In the stateless case, we show that the original private circuits construction of Ishai, Sahai, and Wagner (Crypto 2003) is actually secure against $$\mathsf {AC}^0$$ leakage. In the stateful case, we modify the construction of Rothblum (Crypto 2012), obtaining a simple construction with unconditional security. Prior works that designed leakage-resilient circuit compilers against $$\mathsf {AC}^0$$ leakage had to rely either on secure hardware components (Faust et al., Eurocrypt 2010, Miles-Viola, STOC 2013) or on (unproven) complexity-theoretic assumptions (Rothblum, Crypto 2012).
2019
CRYPTO
Trapdoor Hash Functions and Their Applications
We introduce a new primitive, called trapdoor hash functions (TDH), which are hash functions $$\mathsf {H}: \{0,1\}^n \rightarrow \{0,1\}^\lambda $$ with additional trapdoor function-like properties. Specifically, given an index $$i\in [n]$$, TDHs allow for sampling an encoding key $$\mathsf {ek}$$ (that hides i) along with a corresponding trapdoor. Furthermore, given $$\mathsf {H}(x)$$, a hint value $$\mathsf {E}(\mathsf {ek},x)$$, and the trapdoor corresponding to $$\mathsf {ek}$$, the $$i^{th}$$ bit of x can be efficiently recovered. In this setting, one of our main questions is: How small can the hint value $$\mathsf {E}(\mathsf {ek},x)$$ be? We obtain constructions where the hint is only one bit long based on DDH, QR, DCR, or LWE.This primitive opens a floodgate of applications for low-communication secure computation. We mainly focus on two-message protocols between a receiver and a sender, with private inputs x and y, resp., where the receiver should learn f(x, y). We wish to optimize the (download) rate of such protocols, namely the asymptotic ratio between the size of the output and the sender’s message. Using TDHs, we obtain:1.The first protocols for (two-message) rate-1 string OT based on DDH, QR, or LWE. This has several useful consequences, such as:(a)The first constructions of PIR with communication cost poly-logarithmic in the database size based on DDH or QR. These protocols are in fact rate-1 when considering block PIR.(b)The first constructions of a semi-compact homomorphic encryption scheme for branching programs, where the encrypted output grows only with the program length, based on DDH or QR.(c)The first constructions of lossy trapdoor functions with input to output ratio approaching 1 based on DDH, QR or LWE.(d)The first constant-rate LWE-based construction of a 2-message “statistically sender-private” OT protocol in the plain model.2.The first rate-1 protocols (under any assumption) for n parallel OTs and matrix-vector products from DDH, QR or LWE. We further consider the setting where f evaluates a RAM program y with running time $$T\ll |x|$$ on x. We obtain the first protocols with communication sublinear in the size of x, namely $$T\cdot \sqrt{|x|}$$ or $$T\cdot \root 3 \of {|x|}$$, based on DDH or, resp., pairings (and correlated-input secure hash functions).
2019
CRYPTO
Zero-Knowledge Proofs on Secret-Shared Data via Fully Linear PCPs
We introduce and study the notion of fully linear probabilistically checkable proof systems. In such a proof system, the verifier can make a small number of linear queries that apply jointly to the input and a proof vector.Our new type of proof system is motivated by applications in which the input statement is not fully available to any single verifier, but can still be efficiently accessed via linear queries. This situation arises in scenarios where the input is partitioned or secret-shared between two or more parties, or alternatively is encoded using an additively homomorphic encryption or commitment scheme. This setting appears in the context of secure messaging platforms, verifiable outsourced computation, PIR writing, private computation of aggregate statistics, and secure multiparty computation (MPC). In all these applications, there is a need for fully linear proof systems with short proofs.While several efficient constructions of fully linear proof systems are implicit in the interactive proofs literature, many questions about their complexity are open. We present several new constructions of fully linear zero-knowledge proof systems with sublinear proof size for “simple” or “structured” languages. For example, in the non-interactive setting of fully linear PCPs, we show how to prove that an input vector $$x\in {\mathbb {F}}^n$$, for a finite field $${\mathbb {F}}$$, satisfies a single degree-2 equation with a proof of size $$O(\sqrt{n})$$ and $$O(\sqrt{n})$$ linear queries, which we show to be optimal. More generally, for languages that can be recognized by systems of constant-degree equations, we can reduce the proof size to $$O(\log n)$$ at the cost of $$O(\log n)$$ rounds of interaction.We use our new proof systems to construct new short zero-knowledge proofs on distributed and secret-shared data. These proofs can be used to improve the performance of the example systems mentioned above.Finally, we observe that zero-knowledge proofs on distributed data provide a general-purpose tool for protecting MPC protocols against malicious parties. Applying our short fully linear PCPs to “natural” MPC protocols in the honest-majority setting, we can achieve unconditional protection against malicious parties with sublinear additive communication cost. We use this to improve the communication complexity of recent honest-majority MPC protocols. For instance, using any pseudorandom generator, we obtain a 3-party protocol for Boolean circuits in which the amortized communication cost is only one bit per AND gate per party (compared to 10 bits in the best previous protocol), matching the best known protocols for semi-honest parties.
2019
CRYPTO
Reusable Non-Interactive Secure Computation
We consider the problem of Non-Interactive Two-Party Secure Computation (NISC), where Rachel wishes to publish an encryption of her input x, in such a way that any other party, who holds an input y, can send her a single message which conveys to her the value f(x, y), and nothing more. We demand security against malicious parties. While such protocols are easy to construct using garbled circuits and general non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs, this approach inherently makes a non-black-box use of the underlying cryptographic primitives and is infeasible in practice.Ishai et al. (Eurocrypt 2011) showed how to construct NISC protocols that only use parallel calls to an ideal oblivious transfer (OT) oracle, and additionally make only a black-box use of any pseudorandom generator. Combined with the efficient 2-message OT protocol of Peikert et al. (Crypto 2008), this leads to a practical approach to NISC that has been implemented in subsequent works. However, a major limitation of all known OT-based NISC protocols is that they are subject to selective failure attacks that allows a malicious sender to entirely compromise the security of the protocol when the receiver’s first message is reused.Motivated by the failure of the OT-based approach, we consider the problem of basing reusable NISC on parallel invocations of a standard arithmetic generalization of OT known as oblivious linear-function evaluation (OLE). We obtain the following results:We construct an information-theoretically secure reusable NISC protocol for arithmetic branching programs and general zero-knowledge functionalities in the OLE-hybrid model. Our zero-knowledge protocol only makes an absolute constant number of OLE calls per gate in an arithmetic circuit whose satisfiability is being proved. We also get reusable NISC in the OLE-hybrid model for general Boolean circuits using any one-way function.We complement this by a negative result, showing that reusable NISC is impossible to achieve in the OT-hybrid model. This provides a formal justification for the need to replace OT by OLE.We build a universally composable 2-message reusable OLE protocol in the CRS model that can be based on the security of Paillier encryption and requires only a constant number of modular exponentiations. This provides the first arithmetic analogue of the 2-message OT protocols of Peikert et al. (Crypto 2008).By combining our NISC protocol in the OLE-hybrid model and the 2-message OLE protocol, we get protocols with new attractive asymptotic and concrete efficiency features. In particular, we get the first (designated-verifier) NIZK protocols for NP where following a statement-independent preprocessing, both proving and verifying are entirely “non-cryptographic” and involve only a constant computational overhead. Furthermore, we get the first statistical designated-verifier NIZK argument for NP under an assumption related to factoring.
2019
CRYPTO
Efficient Pseudorandom Correlation Generators: Silent OT Extension and More
Secure multiparty computation (MPC) often relies on correlated randomness for better efficiency and simplicity. This is particularly useful for MPC with no honest majority, where input-independent correlated randomness enables a lightweight “non-cryptographic” online phase once the inputs are known. However, since the amount of randomness typically scales with the circuit size of the function being computed, securely generating correlated randomness forms an efficiency bottleneck, involving a large amount of communication and storage.A natural tool for addressing the above limitations is a pseudorandom correlation generator (PCG). A PCG allows two or more parties to securely generate long sources of useful correlated randomness via a local expansion of correlated short seeds and no interaction. PCGs enable MPC with silent preprocessing, where a small amount of interaction used for securely sampling the seeds is followed by silent local generation of correlated pseudorandomness.A concretely efficient PCG for Vector-OLE correlations was recently obtained by Boyle et al. (CCS 2018) based on variants of the learning parity with noise (LPN) assumption over large fields. In this work, we initiate a systematic study of PCGs and present concretely efficient constructions for several types of useful MPC correlations. We obtain the following main contributions:PCG foundations. We give a general security definition for PCGs. Our definition suffices for any MPC protocol satisfying a stronger security requirement that is met by existing protocols. We prove that a stronger security requirement is indeed necessary, and justify our PCG definition by ruling out a stronger and more natural definition.Silent OT extension. We present the first concretely efficient PCG for oblivious transfer correlations. Its security is based on a variant of the binary LPN assumption and any correlation-robust hash function. We expect it to provide a faster alternative to the IKNP OT extension protocol (Crypto 2003) when communication is the bottleneck. We present several applications, including protocols for non-interactive zero-knowledge with bounded-reusable preprocessing from binary LPN, and concretely efficient related-key oblivious pseudorandom functions.PCGs for simple 2-party correlations. We obtain PCGs for several other types of useful 2-party correlations, including (authenticated) one-time truth-tables and Beaver triples. While the latter PCGs are slower than our PCG for OT, they are still practically feasible. These PCGs are based on a host of assumptions and techniques, including specialized homomorphic secret sharing schemes and pseudorandom generators tailored to their structure.Multiparty correlations. We obtain PCGs for multiparty correlations that can be used to make the (input-dependent) online communication of MPC protocols scale linearly with the number of parties, instead of quadratically.
2018
JOFC
2018
EUROCRYPT
2018
CRYPTO
Limits of Practical Sublinear Secure Computation 📺
Secure computations on big data call for protocols that have sublinear communication complexity in the input length. While fully homomorphic encryption (FHE) provides a general solution to the problem, employing it on a large scale is currently quite far from being practical. This is also the case for secure computation tasks that reduce to weaker forms of FHE such as “somewhat homomorphic encryption” or single-server private information retrieval (PIR).Quite unexpectedly, Aggarwal, Mishra, and Pinkas (Eurocrypt 2004), Brickell and Shmatikov (Asiacrypt 2005), and Shelat and Venkitasubramaniam (Asiacrypt 2015) have shown that in several natural instances of secure computation on big data, there are practical sublinear communication protocols that only require sublinear local computation and minimize the use of expensive public-key operations. This raises the question of whether similar protocols exist for other natural problems.In this paper we put forward a framework for separating “practical” sublinear protocols from “impractical” ones, and establish a methodology for identifying “provably hard” big-data problems that do not admit practical protocols. This is akin to the use of NP-completeness to separate hard algorithmic problems from easy ones. We show that while the previous protocols of Aggarwal et al., Brickell and Shmatikov, and Shelat and Venkitasubramaniam are indeed classified as being “practical” in this framework, slight variations of the problems they solve and other natural computational problems on big data are hard.Our negative results are established by showing that the problem at hand is “PIR-hard” in the sense that any secure protocol for the problem implies PIR on a large database. This imposes a barrier on the local computational cost of secure protocols for the problem. We also identify a new natural relaxation of PIR that we call semi-PIR, which is useful for establishing “intermediate hardness” of several practically motivated secure computation tasks. We show that semi-PIR implies slightly sublinear PIR via an adaptive black-box reduction and that ruling out a stronger black-box reduction would imply a major breakthrough in complexity theory. We also establish information-theoretic separations between semi-PIR and PIR, showing that some problems that we prove to be semi-PIR-hard are not PIR-hard.
2018
CRYPTO
Private Circuits: A Modular Approach 📺
We consider the problem of protecting general computations against constant-rate random leakage. That is, the computation is performed by a randomized boolean circuit that maps a randomly encoded input to a randomly encoded output, such that even if the value of every wire is independently leaked with some constant probability $$p > 0$$ p>0, the leakage reveals essentially nothing about the input.In this work we provide a conceptually simple, modular approach for solving the above problem, providing a simpler and self-contained alternative to previous constructions of Ajtai (STOC 2011) and Andrychowicz et al. (Eurocrypt 2016). We also obtain several extensions and generalizations of this result. In particular, we show that for every leakage probability $$p<1$$ p<1, there is a finite basis $$\mathbb {B}$$ B such that leakage-resilient computation with leakage probability p can be realized using circuits over the basis $$\mathbb {B}$$ B. We obtain similar positive results for the stronger notion of leakage tolerance, where the input is not encoded, but the leakage from the entire computation can be simulated given random $$p'$$ p′-leakage of input values alone, for any $$p<p'<1$$ p<p′<1. Finally, we complement this by a negative result, showing that for every basis $$\mathbb {B}$$ B there is some leakage probability $$p<1$$ p<1 such that for any $$p'<1$$ p′<1, leakage tolerance as above cannot be achieved in general.We show that our modular approach is also useful for protecting computations against worst case leakage. In this model, we require that leakage of any $$\mathbf{t}$$ t (adversarially chosen) wires reveal nothing about the input. By combining our construction with a previous derandomization technique of Ishai et al. (ICALP 2013), we show that security in this setting can be achieved with $$O(\mathbf{t}^{1+\varepsilon })$$ O(t1+ε) random bits, for every constant $$\varepsilon > 0$$ ε>0. This (near-optimal) bound significantly improves upon previous constructions that required more than $$\mathbf{t}^{3}$$ t3 random bits.
2018
PKC
On the Message Complexity of Secure Multiparty Computation
We study the minimal number of point-to-point messages required for general secure multiparty computation (MPC) in the setting of computational security against semi-honest, static adversaries who may corrupt an arbitrary number of parties.We show that for functionalities that take inputs from n parties and deliver outputs to k parties, $$2n+k-3$$2n+k-3 messages are necessary and sufficient. The negative result holds even when given access to an arbitrary correlated randomness setup. The positive result can be based on any 2-round MPC protocol (which can in turn can be based on 2-message oblivious transfer), or on a one-way function given a correlated randomness setup.
2018
CRYPTO
On the Local Leakage Resilience of Linear Secret Sharing Schemes 📺
We consider the following basic question: to what extent are standard secret sharing schemes and protocols for secure multiparty computation that build on them resilient to leakage? We focus on a simple local leakage model, where the adversary can apply an arbitrary function of a bounded output length to the secret state of each party, but cannot otherwise learn joint information about the states.We show that additive secret sharing schemes and high-threshold instances of Shamir’s secret sharing scheme are secure under local leakage attacks when the underlying field is of a large prime order and the number of parties is sufficiently large. This should be contrasted with the fact that any linear secret sharing scheme over a small characteristic field is clearly insecure under local leakage attacks, regardless of the number of parties. Our results are obtained via tools from Fourier analysis and additive combinatorics.We present two types of applications of the above results and techniques. As a positive application, we show that the “GMW protocol” for honest-but-curious parties, when implemented using shared products of random field elements (so-called “Beaver Triples”), is resilient in the local leakage model for sufficiently many parties and over certain fields. This holds even when the adversary has full access to a constant fraction of the views. As a negative application, we rule out multi-party variants of the share conversion scheme used in the 2-party homomorphic secret sharing scheme of Boyle et al. (Crypto 2016).
2018
TCC
Two-Round MPC: Information-Theoretic and Black-Box
We continue the study of protocols for secure multiparty computation (MPC) that require only two rounds of interaction. The recent works of Garg and Srinivasan (Eurocrypt 2018) and Benhamouda and Lin (Eurocrypt 2018) essentially settle the question by showing that such protocols are implied by the minimal assumption that a two-round oblivious transfer (OT) protocol exists. However, these protocols inherently make a non-black-box use of the underlying OT protocol, which results in poor concrete efficiency. Moreover, no analogous result was known in the information-theoretic setting, or alternatively based on one-way functions, given an OT correlations setup or an honest majority.Motivated by these limitations, we study the possibility of obtaining information-theoretic and “black-box” implementations of two-round MPC protocols. We obtain the following results:Two-round MPC from OT correlations. Given an OT correlations setup, we get protocols that make a black-box use of a pseudorandom generator (PRG) and are secure against a malicious adversary corrupting an arbitrary number of parties. For a semi-honest adversary, we get similar information-theoretic protocols for branching programs.New NIOT constructions. Towards realizing OT correlations, we extend the DDH-based non-interactive OT (NIOT) protocol of Bellare and Micali (Crypto’89) to the malicious security model, and present new NIOT constructions from the Quadratic Residuosity Assumption (QRA) and the Learning With Errors (LWE) assumption.Two-round black-box MPC with strong PKI setup. Combining the two previous results, we get two-round MPC protocols that make a black-box use of any DDH-hard or QRA-hard group. The protocols can offer security against a malicious adversary, and require a PKI setup that depends on the number of parties and the size of computation, but not on the inputs or the identities of the participating parties.Two-round honest-majority MPC from secure channels. Given secure point-to-point channels, we get protocols that make a black-box use of a pseudorandom generator (PRG), as well as information-theoretic protocols for branching programs. These protocols can tolerate a semi-honest adversary corrupting a strict minority of the parties, where in the information-theoretic case the complexity is exponential in the number of parties.
2018
TCC
Best Possible Information-Theoretic MPC
We reconsider the security guarantee that can be achieved by general protocols for secure multiparty computation in the most basic of settings: information-theoretic security against a semi-honest adversary. Since the 1980s, we have elegant solutions to this problem that offer full security, as long as the adversary controls a minority of the parties, but fail completely when that threshold is crossed. In this work, we revisit this problem, questioning the optimality of the standard notion of security. We put forward a new notion of information-theoretic security which is strictly stronger than the standard one, and which we argue to be “best possible.” This notion still requires full security against dishonest minority in the usual sense, and adds a meaningful notion of information-theoretic security even against dishonest majority.We present protocols for useful classes of functions that satisfy this new notion of security. Our protocols have the unique feature of combining the efficiency benefits of protocols for an honest majority and (most of) the security benefits of protocols for dishonest majority. We further extend some of the solutions to the malicious setting.
2018
TCC
Exploring Crypto Dark Matter:
Pseudorandom functions (PRFs) are one of the fundamental building blocks in cryptography. Traditionally, there have been two main approaches for PRF design: the “practitioner’s approach” of building concretely-efficient constructions based on known heuristics and prior experience, and the “theoretician’s approach” of proposing constructions and reducing their security to a previously-studied hardness assumption. While both approaches have their merits, the resulting PRF candidates vary greatly in terms of concrete efficiency and design complexity.In this work, we depart from these traditional approaches by exploring a new space of plausible PRF candidates. Our guiding principle is to maximize simplicity while optimizing complexity measures that are relevant to cryptographic applications. Our primary focus is on weak PRFs computable by very simple circuits—specifically, depth-2$$\mathsf {ACC}^0$$ circuits. Concretely, our main weak PRF candidate is a “piecewise-linear” function that first applies a secret mod-2 linear mapping to the input, and then a public mod-3 linear mapping to the result. We also put forward a similar depth-3 strong PRF candidate.The advantage of our approach is twofold. On the theoretical side, the simplicity of our candidates enables us to draw many natural connections between their hardness and questions in complexity theory or learning theory (e.g., learnability of $$\mathsf {ACC}^0$$ and width-3 branching programs, interpolation and property testing for sparse polynomials, and new natural proof barriers for showing super-linear circuit lower bounds). On the applied side, the piecewise-linear structure of our candidates lends itself nicely to applications in secure multiparty computation (MPC). Using our PRF candidates, we construct protocols for distributed PRF evaluation that achieve better round complexity and/or communication complexity (often both) compared to protocols obtained by combining standard MPC protocols with PRFs like AES, LowMC, or Rasta (the latter two are specialized MPC-friendly PRFs).Finally, we introduce a new primitive we call an encoded-input PRF, which can be viewed as an interpolation between weak PRFs and standard (strong) PRFs. As we demonstrate, an encoded-input PRF can often be used as a drop-in replacement for a strong PRF, combining the efficiency benefits of weak PRFs and the security benefits of strong PRFs. We conclude by showing that our main weak PRF candidate can plausibly be boosted to an encoded-input PRF by leveraging standard error-correcting codes.
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
CRYPTO
2017
CRYPTO
2017
ASIACRYPT
2017
ASIACRYPT
2017
TCC
2017
TCC
2017
TCC
2017
TCC
2016
CRYPTO
2016
CRYPTO
2016
CRYPTO
2016
PKC
2016
TCC
2016
TCC
2015
JOFC
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
TCC
2015
EUROCRYPT
2015
CRYPTO
2015
CRYPTO
2015
CRYPTO
2015
CRYPTO
2015
CRYPTO
2014
CRYPTO
2014
CRYPTO
2014
EUROCRYPT
2014
EUROCRYPT
2014
TCC
2014
TCC
2014
EPRINT
2013
TCC
2013
TCC
2013
CRYPTO
2013
CRYPTO
2012
TCC
2012
TCC
2011
CRYPTO
2011
EUROCRYPT
2011
TCC
2010
TCC
2010
TCC
2010
TCC
2010
JOFC
2010
ASIACRYPT
2010
CRYPTO
2010
CRYPTO
2010
EUROCRYPT
2010
EUROCRYPT
2010
EPRINT
On Achieving the "Best of Both Worlds" in Secure Multiparty Computation
Two settings are traditionally considered for secure multiparty computation, depending on whether or not a majority of the parties are assumed to be honest. Protocols designed under this assumption provide ``full security'' (and, in particular, guarantee output delivery and fairness) when this assumption holds; unfortunately, these protocols are completely insecure if this assumption is violated. On the other hand, protocols tolerating an arbitrary number of corruptions do not guarantee fairness or output delivery even if only a \emph{single} party is dishonest. It is natural to wonder whether it is possible to achieve the ``best of both worlds'': namely, a single protocol that simultaneously achieves the best possible security in both the above settings. Here, we rule out this possibility (at least for general functionalities) but show some positive results regarding what \emph{can} be achieved.
2010
EPRINT
Interactive Locking, Zero-Knowledge PCPs, and Unconditional Cryptography
Motivated by the question of basing cryptographic protocols on stateless tamper-proof hardware tokens, we revisit the question of unconditional two-prover zero-knowledge proofs for $NP$. We show that such protocols exist in the {\em interactive PCP} model of Kalai and Raz (ICALP '08), where one of the provers is replaced by a PCP oracle. This strengthens the feasibility result of Ben-Or, Goldwasser, Kilian, and Wigderson (STOC '88) which requires two stateful provers. In contrast to previous zero-knowledge PCPs of Kilian, Petrank, and Tardos (STOC '97), in our protocol both the prover and the PCP oracle are efficient given an $NP$ witness. Our main technical tool is a new primitive that we call {\em interactive locking}, an efficient realization of an unconditionally secure commitment scheme in the interactive PCP model. We implement interactive locking by adapting previous constructions of {\em interactive hashing} protocols to our setting, and also provide a direct construction which uses a minimal amount of interaction and improves over our interactive hashing based constructions. Finally, we apply the above results towards showing the feasibility of basing unconditional cryptography on {\em stateless} tamper-proof hardware tokens, and obtain the following results: *) We show that if tokens can be used to encapsulate other tokens, then there exist unconditional and statistically secure (in fact, UC secure) protocols for general secure computation. *) Even if token encapsulation is not possible, there are unconditional and statistically secure commitment protocols and zero-knowledge proofs for $NP$. *) Finally, if token encapsulation is not possible, then no protocol can realize statistically secure oblivious transfer.
2010
EPRINT
Perfectly Secure Multiparty Computation and the Computational Overhead of Cryptography
We study the following two related questions: - What are the minimal computational resources required for general secure multiparty computation in the presence of an honest majority? - What are the minimal resources required for two-party primitives such as zero-knowledge proofs and general secure two-party computation? We obtain a nearly tight answer to the first question by presenting a perfectly secure protocol which allows $n$ players to evaluate an arithmetic circuit of size $s$ by performing a total of $\O(s\log s\log^2 n)$ arithmetic operations, plus an additive term which depends (polynomially) on $n$ and the circuit depth, but only logarithmically on $s$. Thus, for typical large-scale computations whose circuit width is much bigger than their depth and the number of players, the amortized overhead is just polylogarithmic in $n$ and $s$. The protocol provides perfect security with guaranteed output delivery in the presence of an active, adaptive adversary corrupting a $(1/3-\epsilon)$ fraction of the players, for an arbitrary constant $\epsilon>0$ and sufficiently large $n$. The best previous protocols in this setting could only offer computational security with a computational overhead of $\poly(k,\log n,\log s)$, where $k$ is a computational security parameter, or perfect security with a computational overhead of $\O(n\log n)$. We then apply the above result towards making progress on the second question. Concretely, under standard cryptographic assumptions, we obtain zero-knowledge proofs for circuit satisfiability with $2^{-k}$ soundness error in which the amortized computational overhead per gate is only {\em polylogarithmic} in $k$, improving over the $\omega(k)$ overhead of the best previous protocols. Under stronger cryptographic assumptions, we obtain similar results for general secure two-party computation.
2010
EPRINT
Founding Cryptography on Tamper-Proof Hardware Tokens
A number of works have investigated using tamper-proof hardwaretokens as tools to achieve a variety of cryptographic tasks. In particular, Goldreich and Ostrovsky considered the goal of software protection via oblivious RAM. Goldwasser, Kalai, and Rothblum introduced the concept of \emph{one-time programs}: in a one-time program, an honest sender sends a set of {\em simple} hardware tokens to a (potentially malicious) receiver. The hardware tokens allow the receiver to execute a secret program specified by the sender's tokens exactly once (or, more generally, up to a fixed $t$ times). A recent line of work initiated by Katz examined the problem ofachieving UC-secure computation using hardware tokens. Motivated by the goal of unifying and strengthening these previous notions, we consider the general question of basing secure computation on hardware tokens. We show that the following tasks, which cannot be realized in the ``plain'' model, become feasible if the parties are allowed to generate and exchange tamper-proof hardware tokens. Unconditional non-interactive secure computation: We show that by exchanging simple stateful hardware tokens, any functionality can be realized with unconditional security against malicious parties. In the case of two-party functionalities $f(x,y)$ which take their inputs from a sender and a receiver and deliver their output to the receiver, our protocol is non-interactive and only requires a unidirectional communication of simple stateful tokens from the sender to the receiver. This strengthens previous feasibility results for one-time programs both by providing unconditional security and by offering general protection against malicious senders. As is typically the case for unconditionally secure protocols, our protocol is in fact UC-secure. This improves over previous works on UC-secure computation based on hardware tokens, which provided computational security under cryptographic assumptions. Interactive Secure computation from stateless tokens based on one-way functions: We show that stateless hardware tokens are sufficient to base general secure (in fact, UC-secure) computation on the existence of one-way functions. One cannot hope for security against unbounded adversaries with stateless tokens since an unbounded adversary could query the token multiple times to ``learn" the functionality it contains. Non-interactive secure computation from stateless tokens: We consider the problem of designing non-interactive secure computation from stateless tokens for stateless oblivious reactive functionalities, i.e., reactive functionalities which allow unlimited queries from the receiver (these are the only functionalities one can hope to realize non-interactively with stateless tokens). By building on recent techniques from resettably secure computation, we give a general positive result for stateless oblivious reactive functionalities under standard cryptographic assumption. This result generalizes the notion of (unlimited-use) obfuscation by providing security against a malicious sender, and also provides the first general feasibility result for program obfuscation using stateless tokens.
2010
EPRINT
Black-Box Constructions of Protocols for Secure Computation
It is well known that secure computation without an honest majority requires computational assumptions. An interesting question that therefore arises relates to the way such computational assumptions are used. Specifically, can the secure protocol use the underlying primitive (e.g., a one-way trapdoor permutation) in a {\em black-box} way, treating it as an oracle, or must it be {\em nonblack-box} (by referring to the code that computes the primitive)? Despite the fact that many general constructions of cryptographic schemes refer to the underlying primitive in a black-box wayonly, there are some constructions that are inherently nonblack-box. Indeed, all known constructions of protocols for general secure computation that are secure in the presence of a malicious adversary and without an honest majority use the underlying primitive in a nonblack-box way (requiring to prove in zero-knowledge statements that relate to the primitive). In this paper, we study whether such nonblack-box use is essential. We answer this question in the negative. Concretely, we present a \emph{fully black-box reduction} from oblivious transfer with security against malicious parties to oblivious transfer with security against semi-honest parties. As a corollary, we get the first constructions of general multiparty protocols (with security against malicious adversaries and without an honest majority) which only make a {\em black-box} use of semi-honest oblivious transfer, or alternatively a black-box use of lower-level primitives such as enhanced trapdoor permutations or homomorphic encryption.
2009
TCC
2009
JOFC
2008
TCC
2008
TCC
2008
EUROCRYPT
2008
CRYPTO
2008
CRYPTO
2008
EPRINT
Secure Arithmetic Computation with No Honest Majority
We study the complexity of securely evaluating arithmetic circuits over finite rings. This question is motivated by natural secure computation tasks. Focusing mainly on the case of {\em two-party} protocols with security against {\em malicious} parties, our main goals are to: (1) only make black-box calls to the ring operations and standard cryptographic primitives, and (2) minimize the number of such black-box calls as well as the communication overhead. We present several solutions which differ in their efficiency, generality, and underlying intractability assumptions. These include: \begin{itemize} \item An {\em unconditionally secure} protocol in the OT-hybrid model which makes a black-box use of an arbitrary ring $R$, but where the number of ring operations grows linearly with (an upper bound on) $\log|R|$. \item Computationally secure protocols in the OT-hybrid model which make a black-box use of an underlying ring, and in which the numberof ring operations does not grow with the ring size. The protocols rely on variants of previous intractability assumptions related to linear codes. In the most efficient instance of these protocols, applied to a suitable class of fields, the (amortized) communication cost is a constant number of field elements per multiplication gate and the computational cost is dominated by $O(\log k)$ field operations per gate, where$k$ is a security parameter. These results extend a previous approach of Naor and Pinkas for secure polynomial evaluation ({\em SIAM J.\ Comput.}, 35(5), 2006). \item A protocol for the rings $\mathbb{Z}_m=\mathbb{Z}/m\mathbb{Z}$ which only makes a black-box use of a homomorphic encryption scheme. When $m$ is prime, the (amortized) number of calls to the encryption scheme for each gate of the circuit is constant. \end{itemize} All of our protocols are in fact {\em UC-secure} in the OT-hybrid model and can be generalized to {\em multiparty} computation with an arbitrary number of malicious parties.
2007
CRYPTO
2007
CRYPTO
2007
TCC
2006
CRYPTO
2006
CRYPTO
2006
EUROCRYPT
2006
EPRINT
Cryptography from Anonymity
There is a vast body of work on {\em implementing} anonymous communication. In this paper, we study the possibility of using anonymous communication as a {\em building block}, and show that one can leverage on anonymity in a variety of cryptographic contexts. Our results go in two directions. \begin{itemize} \item{\bf Feasibility.} We show that anonymous communication over {\em insecure} channels can be used to implement unconditionally secure point-to-point channels, and hence general multi-party protocols with unconditional security in the presence of an honest majority. In contrast, anonymity cannot be generally used to obtain unconditional security when there is no honest majority. \item{\bf Efficiency.} We show that anonymous channels can yield substantial efficiency improvements for several natural secure computation tasks. In particular, we present the first solution to the problem of private information retrieval (PIR) which can handle multiple users while being close to optimal with respect to {\em both} communication and computation. A key observation that underlies these results is that {\em local randomization} of inputs, via secret-sharing, when combined with the {\em global mixing} of the shares, provided by anonymity, allows to carry out useful computations on the inputs while keeping the inputs private. \end{itemize}
2005
CRYPTO
2005
CRYPTO
2005
TCC
2005
TCC
2005
TCC
2005
EPRINT
Constant-Round Multiparty Computation Using a Black-Box Pseudorandom Generator
Ivan Damgård Yuval Ishai
We present a constant-round protocol for general secure multiparty computation which makes a {\em black-box} use of a pseudorandom generator. In particular, the protocol does not require expensive zero-knowledge proofs and its communication complexity does not depend on the computational complexity of the underlying cryptographic primitive. Our protocol withstands an active, adaptive adversary corrupting a minority of the parties. Previous constant-round protocols of this type were only known in the semi-honest model or for restricted classes of functionlities.
2004
EUROCRYPT
2004
JOFC
2004
JOFC
2003
CRYPTO
2003
CRYPTO
2003
EUROCRYPT
2003
EPRINT
Efficient Multi-Party Computation over Rings
Secure multi-party computation (MPC) is an active research area, and a wide range of literature can be found nowadays suggesting improvements and generalizations of existing protocols in various directions. However, all current techniques for secure MPC apply to functions that are represented by (boolean or arithmetic) circuits over finite {\em fields}. We are motivated by two limitations of these techniques: {\sc Generality.} Existing protocols do not apply to computation over more general algebraic structures (except via a brute-force simulation of computation in these structures). {\sc Efficiency.} The best known {\em constant-round} protocols do not efficiently scale even to the case of large finite fields. Our contribution goes in these two directions. First, we propose a basis for unconditionally secure MPC over an arbitrary finite {\em ring}, an algebraic object with a much less nice structure than a field, and obtain efficient MPC protocols requiring only a {\em black-box access} to the ring operations and to random ring elements. Second, we extend these results to the constant-round setting, and suggest efficiency improvements that are relevant also for the important special case of fields. We demonstrate the usefulness of the above results by presenting a novel application of MPC over (non-field) rings to the round-efficient secure computation of the maximum function.
2002
CRYPTO
2001
EUROCRYPT
2001
EUROCRYPT
2001
JOFC
2001
EPRINT
On adaptive vs. non-adaptive security of multiparty protocols
Security analysis of multiparty cryptographic protocols distinguishes between two types of adversarial settings: In the non-adaptive setting, the set of corrupted parties is chosen in advance, before the interaction begins. In the adaptive setting, the adversary chooses who to corrupt during the course of the computation. We study the relations between adaptive security (i.e., security in the adaptive setting) and non-adaptive security, according to two definitions and in several models of computation. While affirming some prevailing beliefs, we also obtain some unexpected results. Some highlights of our results are: o According to the definition of Dodis-Micali-Rogaway (which is set in the information-theoretic model), adaptive and non-adaptive security are equivalent. This holds for both honest-but-curious and Byzantine adversaries, and for any number of parties. o According to the definition of Canetti, for honest-but-curious adversaries, adaptive security is equivalent to non-adaptive security when the number of parties is logarithmic, and is strictly stronger than non-adaptive security when the number of parties is super-logarithmic. For Byzantine adversaries, adaptive security is strictly stronger than non-adaptive security, for any number of parties.
2001
EPRINT
Secure Multiparty Computation of Approximations
Approximation algorithms can sometimes be used to obtain efficient solutions where no efficient exact computation is known. In particular, approximations are often useful in a distributed setting where the inputs are held by different parties and are extremely large. Furthermore, for some applications, the parties want to cooperate to compute a function of their inputs without revealing more information than they have to. Suppose the function $\fhat$ is an approximation to the function $f$. Secure multiparty computation of $f$ allows the parties to compute $f$ without revealing more than they have to, but it requires some additional overhead in computation and communication. Hence, if computation of $f$ is inefficient or just efficient enough to be practical, then secure computation of $f$ may be impractically expensive. Furthermore, a secure computation of $\fhat$ is not necessarily as private as a secure computation of $f$, because the output of $\fhat$ may reveal more information than the output of $f$. In this paper, we present definitions and protocols of secure multiparty approximate computation that show how to realize most of the cost savings available by using $\fhat$ instead of $f$ without losing the privacy of a secure computation of $f$. We make three contributions. First, we give formal definitions of secure multiparty approximate computations. Second, we present an efficient, sublinear-communication, private approximate computation for the Hamming distance; we also give an efficient, polylogarithmic-communication solution for the $L^{2}$ distance in a relaxed model. Finally, we give an efficient private approximation of the permanent and other related \#P-hard problems.
2001
EPRINT
On the Power of Nonlinear Secret-Sharing
Amos Beimel Yuval Ishai
A secret-sharing scheme enables a dealer to distribute a secret among n parties such that only some predefined authorized sets of parties will be able to reconstruct the secret from their shares. The (monotone) collection of authorized sets is called an access structure, and is freely identified with its characteristic monotone function f:{0,1}^n --> {0,1}. A family of secret-sharing schemes is called efficient if the total length of the n shares is polynomial in n. Most previously known secret-sharing schemes belonged to a class of linear schemes, whose complexity coincides with the monotone span program size of their access structure. Prior to this work there was no evidence that nonlinear schemes can be significantly more efficient than linear schemes, and in particular there were no candidates for schemes efficiently realizing access structures which do not lie in NC. The main contribution of this work is the construction of two efficient nonlinear schemes: (1) A scheme with perfect privacy whose access structure is conjectured not to lie in NC; (2) A scheme with statistical privacy whose access structure is conjectured not to lie in P/poly. Another contribution is the study of a class of nonlinear schemes, termed quasi-linear schemes, obtained by composing linear schemes over different fields. We show that while these schemes are possibly (super-polynomially) more powerful than linear schemes, they cannot efficiently realize access structures outside NC.
2000
CRYPTO
1999
CRYPTO
1998
EPRINT
Universal Service Providers for Database Private Information Retrieval
We consider the question of private information retrieval in the so-called ``commodity-based'' model. This model was recently proposed by Beaver for practically-oriented service-provider internet applications. In this paper, we show the following, somewhat surprising, results regarding this model for the problem of private-information retrieval: (1) the service-provider model allows to dramatically reduce the overall communication involving the user, using off-line pre-processing messages from ``service-providers'' to databases, where the service-providers do not need to know the database contents, nor the future user's requests; (2) our service-provider solutions are resilient against more than a majority (in fact, all-but-one) coalitions of service-providers; and (3) these results hold for {\em both} the computational and the information-theoretic setting. More specifically, we exhibit a service-provider algorithm which can ``sell'' (i.e., generate and send) ``commodities'' to users and databases, that subsequently allow users to retrieve database contents in a way which hides from the database which particular item the user retrieves. The service-providers need not know anything about the contents of the databases nor the nature of the user's requests in order to generate commodities. Our commodity-based solution significantly improves communication complexity of the users (i.e., counting both the size of commodities bought by the user from the service-providers and the subsequent communication with the databases) compared to all previously known on-line private information retrieval protocols (i.e., without the help of the service-providers). Moreover, we show how commodities from different service-providers can be {\em combined} in such a way that even if ``all-but-one'' of the service-providers collude with the database, the user's privacy remains intact. Finally, we show how to re-use commodities in case of multiple requests (i.e., in the amortized sense), how to ``check'' commodity-correctness, and how some of the solutions can be extended to the related problem of {\em Private Information Storage}.
1997
EPRINT
Protecting Data Privacy in Private Information Retrieval Schemes
Yuval Ishai Eyal Kushilevitz
Private Information Retrieval (PIR) schemes allow a user to retrieve the i-th bit of a data string x, replicated in k>=2 databases, while keeping the value of i private. The main cost measure for such a scheme is its communication complexity. We study PIR schemes where in addition to the user's privacy we require data privacy. That is, in every invocation of the retrieval protocol the user learns exactly a single physical bit of x and no other information. Further, we require that even a dishonest user would not learn more than a single physical data bit. We present general transformations that allow translating PIR schemes satisfying certain properties into PIR schemes that respect data privacy as well, with a small penalty in the communication complexity. Using our machinery we are able to translate currently known PIR solutions into schemes satisfying the newly introduced, stronger privacy constraint. In particular we get: a k-database scheme of complexity O(log(n) n^{1/(2k-1)}) for every k>=2; an O(log(n))-database scheme of poly-logarithmic complexity; a 2-database computational PIR of complexity O(n^c), for every constant c>0. All these require only a single round of interaction.

Program Committees

Eurocrypt 2019
Eurocrypt 2018
PKC 2016
TCC 2016
TCC 2015
Crypto 2014
TCC 2013
Crypto 2012
TCC 2011
Crypto 2009
TCC 2009
PKC 2008
Crypto 2008
TCC 2007
Eurocrypt 2007
Crypto 2006
TCC 2004
Crypto 2004

Coauthors

William Aiello (1)
Prabhanjan Ananth (2)
Benny Applebaum (5)
Saikrishna Badrinarayanan (1)
Boaz Barak (1)
Omer Barkol (2)
Amos Beimel (6)
Eli Ben-Sasson (2)
Iddo Ben-Tov (1)
Fabrice Benhamouda (1)
Iddo Bentov (1)
Eli Biham (1)
Nir Bitansky (1)
Andrej Bogdanov (2)
Dan Boneh (4)
Elette Boyle (7)
Ran Canetti (3)
Melissa Chase (1)
Kuan Cheng (1)
Alessandro Chiesa (1)
Gil Cohen (1)
Henry Corrigan-Gibbs (1)
Geoffroy Couteau (1)
Ronald Cramer (3)
Giovanni Di Crescenzo (1)
Ivan Damgård (14)
Akshay Degwekar (1)
Giovanni Di-Crescenzo (1)
Yevgeniy Dodis (1)
Nico Döttling (1)
Stefan Dziembowski (3)
Serge Fehr (2)
Joan Feigenbaum (1)
Michael J. Freedman (1)
Ariel Gabizon (1)
Juan A. Garay (2)
Sanjam Garg (4)
Daniel Genkin (4)
Rosario Gennaro (1)
Craig Gentry (1)
Niv Gilboa (7)
S. Dov Gordon (1)
Yaron J. Goren (1)
Vipul Goyal (4)
Jens Groth (2)
Divya Gupta (2)
Iftach Haitner (3)
Shai Halevi (2)
Danny Harnik (2)
Carmit Hazay (1)
Dennis Hofheinz (1)
Abhishek Jain (1)
Jonathan Katz (1)
Joe Kilian (1)
Lisa Kohl (1)
Jonas Kölker (1)
Ilan Komargodski (1)
Daniel Kraschewski (1)
Mikkel Krøigaard (2)
Mikkel Krøigaard (1)
Abishek Kumarasubramanian (1)
Ranjit Kumaresan (3)
Eyal Kushilevitz (28)
Xin Li (1)
Yehuda Lindell (3)
Tianren Liu (1)
Mohammad Mahmoody (3)
Hemanta K. Maji (1)
Giulio Malavolta (1)
Tal Malkin (6)
Sigurd Meldgaard (2)
Peter Bro Miltersen (1)
Manika Mittal (1)
Tal Moran (1)
Tamer Mour (1)
Michael Nielsen (1)
Jesper Buus Nielsen (2)
Kobbi Nissim (2)
Eran Omri (1)
Claudio Orlandi (2)
Rafail Ostrovsky (17)
Omkant Pandey (1)
Omer Paneth (1)
Anat Paskin (2)
Anat Paskin-Cherniavsky (3)
Rafael Pass (1)
Alain Passelègue (1)
Chris Peikert (1)
Erez Petrank (4)
Benny Pinkas (1)
Antigoni Polychroniadou (2)
Manoj Prabhakaran (8)
Tal Rabin (3)
Ran Raz (1)
Omer Reingold (2)
Noga Ron-Zewi (2)
Ron D. Rothblum (1)
Amit Sahai (29)
Peter Scholl (1)
Hakan Seyalioglu (1)
Ronen Shaltiel (1)
Adam Smith (2)
Akshayaram Srinivasan (2)
Martin Strauss (1)
Eran Tromer (1)
Vinod Vaikuntanathan (1)
Ramarathnam Venkatesan (2)
Muthuramakrishnan Venkitasubramaniam (1)
Emanuele Viola (1)
Akshay Wadia (3)
David Wagner (2)
Brent Waters (1)
Hoeteck Wee (1)
Enav Weinreb (1)
Mor Weiss (5)
Christopher Williamson (1)
Mary Wootters (1)
Rebecca N. Wright (1)
David J. Wu (3)
Jürg Wullschleger (1)
Guang Yang (2)
Eylon Yogev (1)
Ching-Hua Yu (1)
Lior Zichron (1)
Vassilis Zikas (3)