International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Abhi Shelat

Affiliation: Northeastern University

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2020
PKC
Going Beyond Dual Execution: MPC for Functions with Efficient Verification 📺
The dual execution paradigm of Mohassel and Franklin (PKC’06) and Huang, Katz and Evans (IEEE ’12) shows how to achieve the notion of 1-bit leakage security at roughly twice the cost of semi-honest security for the special case of two-party secure computation . To date, there are no multi-party computation (MPC) protocols that offer such a strong trade-off between security and semi-honest performance. Our main result is to address this shortcoming by designing 1-bit leakage protocols for the multi-party setting, albeit for a special class of functions. We say that function f ( x ,  y ) is efficiently verifiable by g if the running time of g is always smaller than f and $$g(x,y,z)=1$$ if and only if $$f(x,y)=z$$ . In the two-party setting, we first improve dual execution by observing that the “second execution” can be an evaluation of g instead of f , and that by definition, the evaluation of g is asymptotically more efficient. Our main MPC result is to construct a 1-bit leakage protocol for such functions from any passive protocol for f that is secure up to additive errors and any active protocol for g . An important result by Genkin et al. (STOC ’14) shows how the classic protocols by Goldreich et al. (STOC ’87) and Ben-Or et al. (STOC ’88) naturally support this property, which allows to instantiate our compiler with two-party and multi-party protocols. A key technical result we prove is that the passive protocol for distributed garbling due to Beaver et al. (STOC ’90) is in fact secure up to additive errors against malicious adversaries, thereby, yielding another powerful instantiation of our paradigm in the constant-round multi-party setting. As another concrete example of instantiating our approach, we present a novel protocol for computing perfect matching that is secure in the 1-bit leakage model and whose communication complexity is less than the honest-but-curious implementations of textbook algorithms for perfect matching.
2020
CRYPTO
Multiparty Generation of an RSA Modulus 📺
We present a new multiparty protocol for the distributed generation of biprime RSA moduli, with security against any subset of maliciously colluding parties assuming oblivious transfer and the hardness of factoring. Our protocol is highly modular, and its uppermost layer can be viewed as a template that generalizes the structure of prior works and leads to a simpler security proof. We introduce a combined sampling-and-sieving technique that eliminates both the inherent leakage in the approach of Frederiksen et al. (Crypto'18), and the dependence upon additively homomorphic encryption in the approach of Hazay et al. (JCrypt'19). We combine this technique with an efficient, privacy-free check to detect malicious behavior retroactively when a sampled candidate is not a biprime, and thereby overcome covert rejection-sampling attacks and achieve both asymptotic and concrete efficiency improvements over the previous state of the art.
2019
CRYPTO
Adaptively Secure MPC with Sublinear Communication Complexity 📺
Ran Cohen Abhi Shelat Daniel Wichs
A central challenge in the study of MPC is to balance between security guarantees, hardness assumptions, and resources required for the protocol. In this work, we study the cost of tolerating adaptive corruptions in MPC protocols under various corruption thresholds. In the strongest setting, we consider adaptive corruptions of an arbitrary number of parties (potentially all) and achieve the following results:A two-round secure function evaluation (SFE) protocol in the CRS model, assuming LWE and indistinguishability obfuscation (iO). The communication, the CRS size, and the online-computation are sublinear in the size of the function. The iO assumption can be replaced by secure erasures. Previous results required either the communication or the CRS size to be polynomial in the function size.Under the same assumptions, we construct a “Bob-optimized” 2PC (where Alice talks first, Bob second, and Alice learns the output). That is, the communication complexity and total computation of Bob are sublinear in the function size and in Alice’s input size. We prove impossibility of “Alice-optimized” protocols.Assuming LWE, we bootstrap adaptively secure NIZK arguments to achieve proof size sublinear in the circuit size of the NP-relation. On a technical level, our results are based on laconic function evaluation (LFE) (Quach, Wee, and Wichs, FOCS’18) and shed light on an interesting duality between LFE and FHE.Next, we analyze adaptive corruptions of all-but-one of the parties and show a two-round SFE protocol in the threshold PKI model (where keys of a threshold FHE scheme are pre-shared among the parties) with communication complexity sublinear in the circuit size, assuming LWE and NIZK. Finally, we consider the honest-majority setting, and show a two-round SFE protocol with guaranteed output delivery under the same constraints.
2018
PKC
Multi-Key Searchable Encryption, Revisited
We consider a setting where users store their encrypted documents on a remote server and can selectively share documents with each other. A user should be able to perform keyword searches over all the documents she has access to, including the ones that others shared with her. The contents of the documents, and the search queries, should remain private from the server.This setting was considered by Popa et al. (NSDI ’14) who developed a new cryptographic primitive called Multi-Key Searchable Encryption (MKSE), together with an instantiation and an implementation within a system called Mylar, to address this goal. Unfortunately, Grubbs et al. (CCS ’16) showed that the proposed MKSE definition fails to provide basic security guarantees, and that the Mylar system is susceptible to simple attacks. Most notably, if a malicious Alice colludes with the server and shares a document with an honest Bob then the privacy of all of Bob’s search queries is lost.In this work we revisit the notion of MKSE and propose a new strengthened definition that rules out the above attacks. We then construct MKSE schemes meeting our definition. We first give a simple and efficient construction using only pseudorandom functions. This construction achieves our strong security definition at the cost of increasing the server storage overhead relative to Mylar, essentially replicating the document each time it is shared. We also show that high server storage overhead is not inherent, by giving an alternate (albeit impractical) construction that manages to avoid it using obfuscation.
2017
EUROCRYPT
2016
TCC
2016
TCC
2015
JOFC
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
ASIACRYPT
2013
TCC
2012
TCC
2011
EUROCRYPT
2011
JOFC
2010
ASIACRYPT
2009
TCC
2009
CRYPTO
2008
EPRINT
Simulatable Adaptive Oblivious Transfer
We study an adaptive variant of oblivious transfer in which a sender has N messages, of which a receiver can adaptively choose to receive k one-after-the-other, in such a way that (a) the sender learns nothing about the receiver’s selections, and (b) the receiver only learns about the k requested messages. We propose two practical protocols for this primitive that achieve a stronger security notion than previous schemes with comparable efficiency. In particular, by requiring full simulatability for both sender and receiver security, our notion prohibits a subtle selective-failure attack not addressed by the security notions achieved by previous practical schemes. Our first protocol is a very efficient generic construction from unique blind signatures in the random oracle model. The second construction does not assume random oracles, but achieves remarkable efficiency with only a constant number of group elements sent during each transfer. This second construction uses novel techniques for building efficient simulatable protocols.
2008
ASIACRYPT
2008
CRYPTO
2007
ASIACRYPT
2007
ASIACRYPT
2007
EUROCRYPT
2007
TCC
2006
CRYPTO
2005
CRYPTO
2005
TCC

Program Committees

TCC 2020
Eurocrypt 2019
Crypto 2018
Eurocrypt 2017
Crypto 2016
TCC 2015
Asiacrypt 2014
Eurocrypt 2013
TCC 2013
Crypto 2010
TCC 2008
PKC 2008