International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Vinod Vaikuntanathan

Affiliation: MIT

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2019
EUROCRYPT
Worst-Case Hardness for LPN and Cryptographic Hashing via Code Smoothing 📺
We present a worst case decoding problem whose hardness reduces to that of solving the Learning Parity with Noise (LPN) problem, in some parameter regime. Prior to this work, no worst case hardness result was known for LPN (as opposed to syntactically similar problems such as Learning with Errors). The caveat is that this worst case problem is only mildly hard and in particular admits a quasi-polynomial time algorithm, whereas the LPN variant used in the reduction requires extremely high noise rate of $$1/2-1/\mathrm{poly}(n)$$ . Thus we can only show that “very hard” LPN is harder than some “very mildly hard” worst case problem. We note that LPN with noise $$1/2-1/\mathrm{poly}(n)$$ already implies symmetric cryptography.Specifically, we consider the (n, m, w)-nearest codeword problem ((n, m, w)-NCP) which takes as input a generating matrix for a binary linear code in m dimensions and rank n, and a target vector which is very close to the code (Hamming distance at most w), and asks to find the codeword nearest to the target vector. We show that for balanced (unbiased) codes and for relative error $$w/m \approx {\log ^2 n}/{n}$$ , (n, m, w)-NCP can be solved given oracle access to an LPN distinguisher with noise ratio $$1/2-1/\mathrm{poly}(n)$$ .Our proof relies on a smoothing lemma for codes which we show to have further implications: We show that (n, m, w)-NCP with the aforementioned parameters lies in the complexity class $$\mathrm {{Search}\hbox {-}\mathcal {BPP}}^\mathcal {SZK}$$ (i.e. reducible to a problem that has a statistical zero knowledge protocol) implying that it is unlikely to be $$\mathcal {NP}$$ -hard. We then show that the hardness of LPN with very low noise rate $$\log ^2(n)/n$$ implies the existence of collision resistant hash functions (our aforementioned result implies that in this parameter regime LPN is also in $$\mathcal {BPP}^\mathcal {SZK}$$ ).
2019
CRYPTO
Reusable Non-Interactive Secure Computation
We consider the problem of Non-Interactive Two-Party Secure Computation (NISC), where Rachel wishes to publish an encryption of her input x, in such a way that any other party, who holds an input y, can send her a single message which conveys to her the value f(x, y), and nothing more. We demand security against malicious parties. While such protocols are easy to construct using garbled circuits and general non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs, this approach inherently makes a non-black-box use of the underlying cryptographic primitives and is infeasible in practice.Ishai et al. (Eurocrypt 2011) showed how to construct NISC protocols that only use parallel calls to an ideal oblivious transfer (OT) oracle, and additionally make only a black-box use of any pseudorandom generator. Combined with the efficient 2-message OT protocol of Peikert et al. (Crypto 2008), this leads to a practical approach to NISC that has been implemented in subsequent works. However, a major limitation of all known OT-based NISC protocols is that they are subject to selective failure attacks that allows a malicious sender to entirely compromise the security of the protocol when the receiver’s first message is reused.Motivated by the failure of the OT-based approach, we consider the problem of basing reusable NISC on parallel invocations of a standard arithmetic generalization of OT known as oblivious linear-function evaluation (OLE). We obtain the following results:We construct an information-theoretically secure reusable NISC protocol for arithmetic branching programs and general zero-knowledge functionalities in the OLE-hybrid model. Our zero-knowledge protocol only makes an absolute constant number of OLE calls per gate in an arithmetic circuit whose satisfiability is being proved. We also get reusable NISC in the OLE-hybrid model for general Boolean circuits using any one-way function.We complement this by a negative result, showing that reusable NISC is impossible to achieve in the OT-hybrid model. This provides a formal justification for the need to replace OT by OLE.We build a universally composable 2-message reusable OLE protocol in the CRS model that can be based on the security of Paillier encryption and requires only a constant number of modular exponentiations. This provides the first arithmetic analogue of the 2-message OT protocols of Peikert et al. (Crypto 2008).By combining our NISC protocol in the OLE-hybrid model and the 2-message OLE protocol, we get protocols with new attractive asymptotic and concrete efficiency features. In particular, we get the first (designated-verifier) NIZK protocols for NP where following a statement-independent preprocessing, both proving and verifying are entirely “non-cryptographic” and involve only a constant computational overhead. Furthermore, we get the first statistical designated-verifier NIZK argument for NP under an assumption related to factoring.
2018
EUROCRYPT
2018
EUROCRYPT
2018
CRYPTO
GGH15 Beyond Permutation Branching Programs: Proofs, Attacks, and Candidates 📺
Yilei Chen Vinod Vaikuntanathan Hoeteck Wee
We carry out a systematic study of the GGH15 graded encoding scheme used with general branching programs. This is motivated by the fact that general branching programs are more efficient than permutation branching programs and also substantially more expressive in the read-once setting. Our main results are as follows:Proofs. We present new constructions of private constrained PRFs and lockable obfuscation, for constraints (resp. functions to be obfuscated) that are computable by general branching programs. Our constructions are secure under LWE with subexponential approximation factors. Previous constructions of this kind crucially rely on the permutation structure of the underlying branching programs. Using general branching programs allows us to obtain more efficient constructions for certain classes of constraints (resp. functions), while posing new challenges in the proof, which we overcome using new proof techniques.Attacks. We extend the previous attacks on indistinguishability obfuscation (iO) candidates that use GGH15 encodings. The new attack simply uses the rank of a matrix as the distinguisher, so we call it a “rank attack”. The rank attack breaks, among others, the iO candidate for general read-once branching programs by Halevi, Halevi, Shoup and Stephens-Davidowitz (CCS 2017).Candidate Witness Encryption and iO. Drawing upon insights from our proofs and attacks, we present simple candidates for witness encryption and iO that resist the existing attacks, using GGH15 encodings. Our candidate for witness encryption crucially exploits the fact that formulas in conjunctive normal form (CNFs) can be represented by general, read-once branching programs.
2018
TCC
Traitor-Tracing from LWE Made Simple and Attribute-Based
A traitor tracing scheme is a public key encryption scheme for which there are many secret decryption keys. Any of these keys can decrypt a ciphertext; moreover, even if a coalition of users collude, put together their decryption keys and attempt to create a new decryption key, there is an efficient algorithm to trace the new key to at least one the colluders.Recently, Goyal, Koppula and Waters (GKW, STOC 18) provided the first traitor tracing scheme from LWE with ciphertext and secret key sizes that grow polynomially in $$\log n$$, where n is the number of users. The main technical building block in their construction is a strengthening of (bounded collusion secure) secret-key functional encryption which they refer to as mixed functional encryption (FE).In this work, we improve upon and extend the GKW traitor tracing scheme:We provide simpler constructions of mixed FE schemes based on the LWE assumption. Our constructions improve upon the GKW construction in terms of expressiveness, modularity, and security.We provide a construction of attribute-based traitor tracing for all circuits based on the LWE assumption.
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
PKC
2017
CRYPTO
2017
CRYPTO
2017
TCC
2017
TCC
2016
CRYPTO
2016
CRYPTO
2016
TCC
2016
TCC
2016
TCC
2016
PKC
The Many Faces of Garbled Circuits
Vinod Vaikuntanathan
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
TCC
2015
TCC
2015
TCC
2015
CRYPTO
2015
CRYPTO
2015
ASIACRYPT
2014
EUROCRYPT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2013
CRYPTO
2013
CRYPTO
2013
ASIACRYPT
2013
JOFC
Round-Optimal Password-Based Authenticated Key Exchange
Jonathan Katz Vinod Vaikuntanathan
We show a general framework for constructing password-based authenticated key-exchange protocols with optimal round complexity—one message per party, sent simultaneously—in the standard model, assuming the existence of a common reference string. When our framework is instantiated using bilinear-map-based cryptosystems, the resulting protocol is also (reasonably) efficient. Somewhat surprisingly, our framework can be adapted to give protocols in the standard model that are universally composable while still using only one (simultaneous) round.
2012
TCC
2012
TCC
2012
EUROCRYPT
2012
CRYPTO
2012
PKC
2012
PKC
2011
PKC
2011
TCC
2011
CRYPTO
2011
ASIACRYPT
2011
JOFC
2010
TCC
2010
EPRINT
i-Hop Homomorphic Encryption and Rerandomizable Yao Circuits
Craig Gentry Shai Halevi Vinod Vaikuntanathan
Homomorphic encryption (HE) schemes enable computing functions on encrypted data, by means of a public $\Eval$ procedure that can be applied to ciphertexts. But the evaluated ciphertexts so generated may differ from freshly encrypted ones. This brings up the question of whether one can keep computing on evaluated ciphertexts. An \emph{$i$-hop} homomorphic encryption scheme is one where $\Eval$ can be called on its own output up to $i$~times, while still being able to decrypt the result. A \emph{multi-hop} homomorphic encryption is a scheme which is $i$-hop for all~$i$. In this work we study $i$-hop and multi-hop schemes in conjunction with the properties of function-privacy (i.e., $\Eval$'s output hides the function) and compactness (i.e., the output of $\Eval$ is short). We provide formal definitions and describe several constructions. First, we observe that "bootstrapping" techniques can be used to convert any (1-hop) homomorphic encryption scheme into an $i$-hop scheme for any~$i$, and the result inherits the function-privacy and/or compactness of the underlying scheme. However, if the underlying scheme is not compact (such as schemes derived from Yao circuits) then the complexity of the resulting $i$-hop scheme can be as high as $k^{O(i)}$. We then describe a specific DDH-based multi-hop homomorphic encryption scheme that does not suffer from this exponential blowup. Although not compact, this scheme has complexity linear in the size of the composed function, independently of the number of hops. The main technical ingredient in this solution is a \emph{re-randomizable} variant of the Yao circuits. Namely, given a garbled circuit, anyone can re-garble it in such a way that even the party that generated the original garbled circuit cannot recognize it. This construction may be of independent interest.
2010
EPRINT
A Simple BGN-type Cryptosystem from LWE
Craig Gentry Shai Halevi Vinod Vaikuntanathan
We construct a simple public-key encryption scheme that supports polynomially many additions and one multiplication, similar to the cryptosystem of Boneh, Goh, and Nissim (BGN). Security is based on the hardness of the learning with errors (LWE) problem, which is known to be as hard as certain worst-case lattice problems. Some features of our cryptosystem include support for large message space, an easy way of achieving formula-privacy, a better message-to-ciphertext expansion ratio than BGN, and an easy way of multiplying two encrypted polynomials. Also, the scheme can be made identity-based and leakage-resilient (at the cost of a higher message-to-ciphertext expansion ratio).
2010
EPRINT
One-Round Password-Based Authenticated Key Exchange
Jonathan Katz Vinod Vaikuntanathan
We show a general framework for constructing password-based authenticated key exchange protocols with optimal round complexity --- one message per party, sent simultaneously --- in the standard model, assuming the existence of a common reference string. When our framework is instantiated using bilinear-map cryptosystems, the resulting protocol is also (reasonably) efficient. Somewhat surprisingly, our framework can be adapted to give protocols (still in the standard model) that are universally composable, while still using only one (simultaneous) round.
2010
ASIACRYPT
2010
EPRINT
Cryptography Resilient to Continual Memory Leakage
In recent years, there has been a major effort to design cryptographic schemes that remain secure even if part of the secret key is leaked. This is due to a recent proliferation of side channel attacks which, through various physical means, can recover part of the secret key. We explore the possibility of achieving security even with continual leakage, i.e., even if some information is leaked each time the key is used. We show how to securely update a secret key while information is leaked: We construct schemes that remain secure even if an attacker, {\em at each time period}, can probe the entire memory (containing a secret key) and ``leak'' up to a $(1-o(1))$ fraction of the secret key. The attacker may also probe the memory during the updates, and leak $O(\log k)$ bits, where $k$ is the security parameter (relying on subexponential hardness allows $k^\epsilon$ bits of leakage during each update process). All of the above is achieved without restricting the model as is done in previous works (e.g. by assuming that ``only computation leaks information'' [Micali-Reyzin, TCC04]). Specifically, under the decisional linear assumption on bilinear groups (which allows for a leakage rate of $(1/2-o(1))$) or the symmetric external Diffie-Hellman assumption (which allows for a leakage rate of $(1-o(1))$), we achieve the above for public key encryption, identity-based encryption, and signature schemes. Prior to this work, it was not known how to construct public-key encryption schemes even in the more restricted model of [MR]. The main contributions of this work are (1) showing how to securely update a secret key while information is leaked (in the more general model) and (2) giving a public key encryption (and IBE) schemes that are resilient to continual leakage.
2010
CRYPTO
2010
EUROCRYPT
2010
EUROCRYPT
2010
EUROCRYPT
2009
TCC
2009
TCC
2009
TCC
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
ASIACRYPT
2008
CRYPTO
2008
CRYPTO
2008
CRYPTO
2007
ASIACRYPT
2007
ASIACRYPT
2007
EUROCRYPT
2007
TCC
2007
EPRINT
A Framework for Efficient and Composable Oblivious Transfer
Chris Peikert Vinod Vaikuntanathan Brent Waters
We propose and simple, general, and unified framework for constructing oblivious transfer (OT) protocols that are \emph{efficient}, \emph{universally composable}, and \emph{generally realizable} from a variety of standard number-theoretic assumptions, such as the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption and the Quadratic Residuosity assumption. Most interestingly, we can also instantiate our framework with \emph{worst-case} complexity assumptions relating to \emph{lattices}. Our OT protocols are round-optimal (one message each way), efficient in the parties' communication and local computation, and use only one reference string for an unbounded number of executions. Furthermore, the protocols can provide \emph{unconditional} security to either the sender or receiver, simply by changing the distribution of the reference string. (For several versions of the protocol, even a common \emph{random} string suffices.) One of our key technical contributions is a simple and novel abstraction that we call a \emph{dual-mode} cryptosystem. We implement dual-mode cryptosystems by taking a unified view of several cryptosystems in the literature that have what we call ``message-lossy'' public keys, whose defining property is that a ciphertext produced under such a key carries \emph{no information} (even statistically) about the encrypted message. As a contribution of independent interest, we also provide a multi-bit version of Regev's lattice-based cryptosystem (STOC 2005) whose time and space efficiency are improved by a linear factor. In particular, the amortized runtime per message bit is only $\tilde{O}(n)$ bit operations, and the ciphertext expansion can be made as small as a constant.
2007
EPRINT
Trapdoors for Hard Lattices and New Cryptographic Constructions
Craig Gentry Chris Peikert Vinod Vaikuntanathan
We show how to construct a variety of ``trapdoor'' cryptographic tools assuming the worst-case hardness of standard lattice problems (such as approximating the shortest nonzero vector to within small factors). The applications include trapdoor functions with \emph{preimage sampling}, simple and efficient ``hash-and-sign'' digital signature schemes, universally composable oblivious transfer, and identity-based encryption. A core technical component of our constructions is an efficient algorithm that, given a basis of an arbitrary lattice, samples lattice points from a Gaussian-like probability distribution whose standard deviation is essentially the length of the longest vector in the basis. In particular, the crucial security property is that the output distribution of the algorithm is oblivious to the particular geometry of the given basis.
2006
CRYPTO

Program Committees

TCC 2018
Eurocrypt 2018
TCC 2016
Crypto 2014
TCC 2014
PKC 2013
Asiacrypt 2013
TCC 2012
Eurocrypt 2012
Crypto 2012
Asiacrypt 2010
TCC 2010
Crypto 2010