International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Thomas Peyrin

Affiliation: NTU, Singapore

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2020
TOSC
Duel of the Titans: The Romulus and Remus Families of Lightweight AEAD Algorithms
In this article, we propose two new families of very lightweight and efficient authenticated encryption with associated data (AEAD) modes, Romulus and Remus, that provide security beyond the birthday bound with respect to the block-length n. The former uses a tweakable block cipher (TBC) as internal primitive and can be proven secure in the standard model. The later uses a block cipher (BC) as internal primitive and can be proven secure in the ideal cipher model. Both our modes allow to switch very easily from the nonce-respecting to the nonce-misuse scenario.Previous constructions, such as ΘCB3, are quite computationally efficient, yet needing a large memory for implementation, which makes them unsuitable for platforms where lightweight cryptography should play a key role. Romulus and Remus break this barrier by introducing a new architecture evolved from a BC mode COFB. They achieve the best of what can be possible with TBC – the optimal computational efficiency (rate-1 operation) and the minimum state size of a TBC mode (i.e., (n + t)-bit for n-bit block, t-bit tweak TBC), with almost equivalent provable security as ΘCB3. Actually, our comparisons show that both our designs present superior performances when compared to all other recent lightweight AEAD modes, being BC-based, TBC-based or sponge-based, in the nonce-respecting or nonce-misuse scenario. We eventually describe how to instantiate Romulus and Remus modes using the Skinny lightweight tweakable block cipher proposed at CRYPTO 2016, including the hardware implementation results
2020
TCHES
Fixslicing: A New GIFT Representation: Fast Constant-Time Implementations of GIFT and GIFT-COFB on ARM Cortex-M
The GIFT family of lightweight block ciphers, published at CHES 2017, offers excellent hardware performance figures and has been used, in full or in part, in several candidates of the ongoing NIST lightweight cryptography competition. However, implementation of GIFT in software seems complex and not efficient due to the bit permutation composing its linear layer (a feature shared with PRESENT cipher). In this article, we exhibit a new non-trivial representation of the GIFT family of block ciphers over several rounds. This new representation, that we call fixslicing, allows extremely efficient software bitsliced implementations of GIFT, using only a few rotations, surprisingly placing GIFT as a very efficient candidate on micro-controllers. Our constant time implementations show that, on ARM Cortex-M3, 128-bit data can be ciphered with only about 800 cycles for GIFT-64 and about 1300 cycles for GIFT-128 (assuming pre-computed round keys). In particular, this is much faster than the impressive PRESENT implementation published at CHES 2017 that requires 2116 cycles in the same setting, or the current best AES constant time implementation reported that requires 1617 cycles. This work impacts GIFT, but also improves software implementations of all other cryptographic primitives directly based on it or strongly related to it.
2020
TOSC
Pyjamask: Block Cipher and Authenticated Encryption with Highly Efficient Masked Implementation
This paper introduces Pyjamask, a new block cipher family and authenticated encryption proposal submitted to the NIST lightweight cryptography standardization process. Pyjamask targets side-channel resistance as one of its main goal. More precisely, it strongly minimizes the number of nonlinear gates used in its internal primitive in order to allow efficient masked implementations, especially for high-order masking in software. Compared to other block ciphers, our proposal has thus among the smallest number of binary AND computations per input bit at the time of writing. Even though Pyjamask minimizes such an important criterion, it remains rather lightweight and efficient, thanks to a general bitslice construction that enables to computation of all nonlinear gates in parallel. For authenticated encryption, we adopt the provably secure AEAD mode OCB which has been extensively studied and has the benefit to offer full parallelization. Of course, other block cipher-based modes can be considered as well if other performance profiles are to be targeted.The paper first gives the specification of the Pyjamask block cipher and the associated AEAD proposal. We also provide a detailed design rationale for the block cipher which is guided by our aim of software efficiency in the presence of high-order masking. The security of the design is analyzed against most commonly known cryptanalysis techniques. We finally describe efficient (masked) implementations in software and provide implementation results with aggressive performances for masking of very high orders (up to 128). We also provide a rough estimation of the hardware performances which remain much better than those of an AES round-based implementation.
2020
TOSC
SKINNY-AEAD and SKINNY-Hash
We present the family of authenticated encryption schemes SKINNY-AEAD and the family of hashing schemes SKINNY-Hash. All of the schemes employ a member of the SKINNY family of tweakable block ciphers, which was presented at CRYPTO 2016, as the underlying primitive. In particular, for authenticated encryption, we show how to instantiate members of SKINNY in the Deoxys-I-like ΘCB3 framework to fulfill the submission requirements of the NIST lightweight cryptography standardization process. For hashing, we use SKINNY to build a function with larger internal state and employ it in a sponge construction. To highlight the extensive amount of third-party analysis that SKINNY obtained since its publication, we briefly survey the existing cryptanalysis results for SKINNY-128-256 and SKINNY-128-384 as of February 2020. In the last part of the paper, we provide a variety of ASIC implementations of our schemes and propose new simple SKINNY-AEAD and SKINNY-Hash variants with a reduced number of rounds while maintaining a very comfortable security margin. https://csrc.nist.gov/Projects/Lightweight-Cryptography
2020
CRYPTO
The MALICIOUS Framework: Embedding Backdoors into Tweakable Block Ciphers
haoyang wang thomas peyrin
Inserting backdoors in encryption algorithms has long seemed like a very interesting, yet difficult problem. Most attempts have been unsuccessful for symmetric-key primitives so far and it remains an open problem of how to build such ciphers. In this work, we propose the MALICIOUS framework, a new method to build tweakable block ciphers that have a backdoor hidden, which allows to retrieve the secret key. Our backdoor is differential in nature: a specific related-tweak differential path with high probability is hidden during design phase of the cipher. We explain how the backdoor can be used to practically recover the secret key of a user for any entity knowing the backdoor and we also argue why even knowing the presence of the backdoor and the workings of the cipher will not permit to retrieve the backdoor for an external user. We analyze the security of our construction in the classical black-box model and we show that retrieving the backdoor (the hidden high-probability differential path) is very difficult. We instantiate our framework by proposing the LowMC-M construction, a new family of tweakable block ciphers based on instances of the LowMC cipher, which allow such backdoor embedding. Generating LowMC-M instances is trivial and the LowMC-M family has basically the same efficiency as the LowMC instances it is based on.
2019
TOSC
Boomerang Switch in Multiple Rounds. Application to AES Variants and Deoxys 📺
Haoyang Wang Thomas Peyrin
The boomerang attack is a cryptanalysis technique that allows an attacker to concatenate two short differential characteristics. Several research results (ladder switch, S-box switch, sandwich attack, Boomerang Connectivity Table (BCT), ...) showed that the dependency between these two characteristics at the switching round can have a significant impact on the complexity of the attack, or even potentially invalidate it. In this paper, we revisit the issue of boomerang switching effect, and exploit it in the case where multiple rounds are involved. To support our analysis, we propose a tool called Boomerang Difference Table (BDT), which can be seen as an improvement of the BCT and allows a systematic evaluation of the boomerang switch through multiple rounds. In order to illustrate the power of this technique, we propose a new related-key attack on 10-round AES-256 which requires only 2 simple related-keys and 275 computations. This is a much more realistic scenario than the state-of-the-art 10-round AES-256 attacks, where subkey oracles, or several related-keys and high computational power is needed. Furthermore, we also provide improved attacks against full AES-192 and reduced-round Deoxys.
2019
EUROCRYPT
From Collisions to Chosen-Prefix Collisions Application to Full SHA-1 📺
Gaëtan Leurent Thomas Peyrin
A chosen-prefix collision attack is a stronger variant of a collision attack, where an arbitrary pair of challenge prefixes are turned into a collision. Chosen-prefix collisions are usually significantly harder to produce than (identical-prefix) collisions, but the practical impact of such an attack is much larger. While many cryptographic constructions rely on collision-resistance for their security proofs, collision attacks are hard to turn into break of concrete protocols, because the adversary has a limited control over the colliding messages. On the other hand, chosen-prefix collisions have been shown to break certificates (by creating a rogue CA) and many internet protocols (TLS, SSH, IPsec).In this article, we propose new techniques to turn collision attacks into chosen-prefix collision attacks. Our strategy is composed of two phases: first a birthday search that aims at taking the random chaining variable difference (due to the chosen-prefix model) to a set of pre-defined target differences. Then, using a multi-block approach, carefully analysing the clustering effect, we map this new chaining variable difference to a colliding pair of states using techniques developed for collision attacks.We apply those techniques to MD5 and SHA-1, and obtain improved attacks. In particular, we have a chosen-prefix collision attack against SHA-1 with complexity between $$2^{66.9}$$ and $$2^{69.4}$$ (depending on assumptions about the cost of finding near-collision blocks), while the best-known attack has complexity $$2^{77.1}$$. This is within a small factor of the complexity of the classical collision attack on SHA-1 (estimated as $$2^{64.7}$$). This represents yet another warning that industries and users have to move away from using SHA-1 as soon as possible.
2019
TCHES
Improved Heuristics for Short Linear Programs
Quan Quan Tan Thomas Peyrin
In this article, we propose new heuristics for minimising the amount of XOR gates required to compute a system of linear equations in GF(2). We first revisit the well known Boyar-Peralta strategy and argue that a proper randomisation process during the selection phases can lead to great improvements. We then propose new selection criteria and explain their rationale. Our new methods outperform state-of-the-art algorithms such as Paar or Boyar-Peralta (or open synthesis tools such as Yosys) when tested on random matrices with various densities. They can be applied to matrices of reasonable sizes (up to about 32 × 32). Notably, we provide a new implementation record for the matrix underlying the MixColumns function of the AES block cipher, requiring only 94 XORs.
2018
EUROCRYPT
2017
CRYPTO
2017
TOSC
Practical Evaluation of FSE 2016 Customized Encoding Countermeasure
Shivam Bhasin Dirmanto Jap Thomas Peyrin
To protect against side-channel attacks, many countermeasures have been proposed. A novel customized encoding countermeasure was published in FSE 2016. Customized encoding exploits knowledge of the profiled leakage of the device to construct an optimal encoding and minimize the overall side-channel leakage. This technique was originally applied on a basic table look-up. In this paper, we implement a full block cipher with customized encoding countermeasure and investigate its security under simulated and practical setting for a general purpose microcontroller. Under simulated setting, we can verify that customized encoding shows strong security properties under proper assumption of leakage estimation and noise variance. However, in practical setting, our general observation is that the side-channel leakage will mostly be present even if the encoding scheme is applied, highlighting some limitation of the approach. The results are supported by experiments on 8-bit AVR and 32-bit ARM microcontroller.
2017
TOSC
Human-readable Proof of the Related-Key Security of AES-128
The related-key model is now considered an important scenario for block cipher security and many schemes were broken in this model, even AES-192 and AES-256. Recently were introduced efficient computer-based search tools that can produce the best possible related-key truncated differential paths for AES. However, one has to trust the implementation of these tools and they do not provide any meaningful information on how to design a good key schedule, which remains a challenge for the community as of today. We provide in this article the first human-readable proof on the minimal number of active Sboxes in the related-key model for AES-128, without any help from a computer. More precisely, we show that any related-key differential path for AES-128 will respectively contain at least 0, 1, 3 and 9 active Sboxes for 1, 2, 3 and 4 rounds. Our proof is tight, not trivial, and actually exhibits for the first time the interplay between the key state and the internal state of an AES-like block cipher with an AES-like key schedule. As application example, we leverage our proofs to propose a new key schedule, that is not only faster (a simple permutation on the byte positions) but also ensures a higher number of active Sboxes than AES-128’s key schedule. We believe this is an important step towards a good understanding of efficient and secure key schedule designs.
2017
TOSC
Optimizing Implementations of Lightweight Building Blocks
We study the synthesis of small functions used as building blocks in lightweight cryptographic designs in terms of hardware implementations. This phase most notably appears during the ASIC implementation of cryptographic primitives. The quality of this step directly affects the output circuit, and while general tools exist to carry out this task, most of them belong to proprietary software suites and apply heuristics to any size of functions. In this work, we focus on small functions (4- and 8-bit mappings) and look for their optimal implementations on a specific weighted instructions set which allows fine tuning of the technology. We propose a tool named LIGHTER, based on two related algorithms, that produces optimized implementations of small functions. To demonstrate the validity and usefulness of our tool, we applied it to two practical cases: first, linear permutations that define diffusion in most of SPN ciphers; second, non-linear 4-bit permutations that are used in many lightweight block ciphers. For linear permutations, we exhibit several new MDS diffusion matrices lighter than the state-of-the-art, and we also decrease the implementation cost of several already known MDS matrices. As for non-linear permutations, LIGHTER outperforms the area-optimized synthesis of the state-of-the-art academic tool ABC. Smaller circuits can also be reached when ABC and LIGHTER are used jointly.
2017
TOSC
A Security Analysis of Deoxys and its Internal Tweakable Block Ciphers
In this article, we provide the first independent security analysis of Deoxys, a third-round authenticated encryption candidate of the CAESAR competition, and its internal tweakable block ciphers Deoxys-BC-256 and Deoxys-BC-384. We show that the related-tweakey differential bounds provided by the designers can be greatly improved thanks to a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) based search tool. In particular, we develop a new method to incorporate linear incompatibility in the MILP model. We use this tool to generate valid differential paths for reduced-round versions of Deoxys-BC-256 and Deoxys-BC-384, later combining them into broader boomerang or rectangle attacks. Here, we also develop a new MILP model which optimises the two paths by taking into account the effect of the ladder switch technique. Interestingly, with the tweak in Deoxys-BC providing extra input as opposed to a classical block cipher, we can even consider beyond full-codebook attacks. As these primitives are based on the TWEAKEY framework, we further study how the security of the cipher is impacted when playing with the tweak/key sizes. All in all, we are able to attack 10 rounds of Deoxys-BC-256 (out of 14) and 13 rounds of Deoxys-BC-384 (out of 16). The extra rounds specified in Deoxys-BC to balance the tweak input (when compared to AES) seem to provide about the same security margin as AES-128. Finally we analyse why the authenticated encryption modes of Deoxys mostly prevent our attacks on Deoxys-BC to apply to the authenticated encryption primitive.
2017
CHES
GIFT: A Small Present
In this article, we revisit the design strategy of PRESENT, leveraging all the advances provided by the research community in construction and cryptanalysis since its publication, to push the design up to its limits. We obtain an improved version, named GIFT, that provides a much increased efficiency in all domains (smaller and faster), while correcting the well-known weakness of PRESENT with regards to linear hulls. GIFT is a very simple and clean design that outperforms even SIMON or SKINNY for round-based implementations, making it one of the most energy efficient ciphers as of today. It reaches a point where almost the entire implementation area is taken by the storage and the Sboxes, where any cheaper choice of Sbox would lead to a very weak proposal. In essence, GIFT is composed of only Sbox and bit-wiring, but its natural bitslice data flow ensures excellent performances in all scenarios, from area-optimised hardware implementations to very fast software implementation on high-end platforms.We conducted a thorough analysis of our design with regards to state-of-the-art cryptanalysis, and we provide strong bounds with regards to differential/linear attacks.
2017
CHES
Bit-Sliding: A Generic Technique for Bit-Serial Implementations of SPN-based Primitives
Area minimization is one of the main efficiency criterion for lightweight encryption primitives. While reducing the implementation data path is a natural strategy for achieving this goal, Substitution-Permutation Network (SPN) ciphers are usually hard to implement in a bit-serial way (1-bit data path). More generally, this is hard for any data path smaller than its Sbox size, since many scan flip-flops would be required for storage, which are more area-expensive than regular flip-flops.In this article, we propose the first strategy to obtain extremely small bit-serial ASIC implementations of SPN primitives. Our technique, which we call bit-sliding, is generic and offers many new interesting implementation trade-offs. It manages to minimize the area by reducing the data path to a single bit, while avoiding the use of many scan flip-flops.Following this general architecture, we could obtain the first bit-serial and the smallest implementation of AES-128 to date (1560 GE for encryption only, and 1738 GE for encryption and decryption with IBM 130 nm standard-cell library), greatly improving over the smallest known implementations (about 30% decrease), making AES-128 competitive to many ciphers specifically designed for lightweight cryptography. To exhibit the generality of our strategy, we also applied it to the PRESENT and SKINNY block ciphers, again offering the smallest implementations of these ciphers thus far, reaching an area as low as 1065 GE for a 64-bit block 128-bit key cipher. It is also to be noted that our bit-sliding seems to obtain very good power consumption figures, which makes this implementation strategy a good candidate for passive RFID tags.
2016
EUROCRYPT
2016
CRYPTO
2016
CRYPTO
2016
JOFC
2015
JOFC
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
EPRINT
2015
FSE
2015
FSE
2015
CRYPTO
2015
CRYPTO
2014
CRYPTO
2014
EUROCRYPT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
EPRINT
2014
JOFC
2014
ASIACRYPT
2014
CHES
2013
CRYPTO
2013
ASIACRYPT
2013
ASIACRYPT
2013
ASIACRYPT
2013
EUROCRYPT
2013
FSE
2012
ASIACRYPT
2012
FSE
2012
FSE
2012
FSE
2012
FSE
2011
FSE
2011
CRYPTO
2011
CHES
2010
EPRINT
Distinguishers for the Compression Function and Output Transformation of Hamsi-256
Hamsi is one of 14 remaining candidates in NIST's Hash Competition for the future hash standard SHA-3. Until now, little analysis has been published on its resistance to differential cryptanalysis, the main technique used to attack hash functions. We present a study of Hamsi's resistance to differential and higher-order differential cryptanalysis, with focus on the 256-bit version of Hamsi. Our main results are efficient distinguishers and near-collisions for its full (3-round) compression function, and distinguishers for its full (6-round) finalization function, indicating that Hamsi's building blocks do not behave ideally.
2010
EPRINT
Improved Differential Attacks for ECHO and Grostl
Thomas Peyrin
We present improved cryptanalysis of two second-round SHA-3 candidates: the AES-based hash functions ECHO and GROSTL. We explain methods for building better differential trails for ECHO by increasing the granularity of the truncated differential paths previously considered. In the case of GROSTL, we describe a new technique, the internal differential attack, which shows that when using parallel computations designers should also consider the differential security between the parallel branches. Then, we exploit the recently introduced start-from-the-middle or Super-Sbox attacks, that proved to be very efficient when attacking AES-like permutations, to achieve a very efficient utilization of the available freedom degrees. Finally, we obtain the best known attacks so far for both ECHO and GROSTL. In particular, we are able to mount a distinguishing attack for the full GROSTL-256 compression function.
2010
EPRINT
Side-channel Analysis of Six SHA-3 Candidates
Olivier Benoit Thomas Peyrin
In this paper we study six 2nd round SHA-3 candidates from a side-channel cryptanalysis point of view. For each of them, we give the exact procedure and appropriate choice of selection functions to perform the attack. Depending on their inherent structure and the internal primitives used (Sbox, addition or XOR), some schemes are more prone to side channel analysis than others, as shown by our simulations.
2010
ASIACRYPT
2010
CRYPTO
2010
CHES
2010
FSE
2010
FSE
2009
ASIACRYPT
2009
FSE
2008
FSE
2008
EPRINT
Slide Attacks on a Class of Hash Functions
This paper studies the application of slide attacks to hash functions. Slide attacks have mostly been used for block cipher cryptanalysis. But, as shown in the current paper, they also form a potential threat for hash functions, namely for sponge-function like structures. As it turns out, certain constructions for hash-function-based MACs can be vulnerable to forgery and even to key recovery attacks. In other cases, we can at least distinguish a given hash function from a random oracle. To illustrate our results, we describe attacks against the Grindahl-256 and Grindahl-512 hash functions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first cryptanalytic result on Grindahl-512. Furthermore, we point out a slide-based distinguisher attack on a slightly modified version of RadioGatun. We finally discuss simple countermeasures as a defense against slide attacks.
2008
EPRINT
Inside the Hypercube
Bernstein's CubeHash is a hash function family that includes four functions submitted to the NIST Hash Competition. A CubeHash function is parametrized by a number of rounds r, a block byte size b, and a digest bit length h (the compression function makes r rounds, while the finalization function makes 10r rounds). The 1024-bit internal state of CubeHash is represented as a five-dimensional hypercube. The submissions to NIST recommends r=8, b=1, and h in {224,256,384,512}. This paper presents the first external analysis of CubeHash, with: improved standard generic attacks for collisions and preimages; a multicollision attack that exploits fixed points; a study of the round function symmetries; a preimage attack that exploits these symmetries; a practical collision attack on a weakened version of CubeHash; a study of fixed points and an example of nontrivial fixed point; high-probability truncated differentials over 10 rounds. Since the first publication of these results, several collision attacks for reduced versions of CubeHash were published by Dai, Peyrin, et al. Our results are more general, since they apply to any choice of the parameters, and show intrinsic properties of the CubeHash design, rather than attacks on specific versions.
2008
EPRINT
Cryptanalysis of RadioGatun
Thomas Fuhr Thomas Peyrin
In this paper we study the security of the RadioGatun family of hash functions, and more precisely the collision resistance of this proposal. We show that it is possible to find differential paths with acceptable probability of success. Then, by using the freedom degrees available from the incoming message words, we provide a significant improvement over the best previously known cryptanalysis. As a proof of concept, we provide a colliding pair of messages for RadioGatun with 2-bit words. We finally argue that, under some light assumption, our technique is very likely to provide the first collision attack on RadioGatun.
2008
ASIACRYPT
2007
ASIACRYPT
Cryptanalysis of Grindahl
Thomas Peyrin
2007
CRYPTO
2007
FSE
2007
FSE
2006
ASIACRYPT
2005
ASIACRYPT

Program Committees

FSE 2020
CHES 2020
CHES 2019
Crypto 2019
CHES 2018
Asiacrypt 2018
Asiacrypt 2017
FSE 2017
Asiacrypt 2016
CHES 2016
FSE 2016
Crypto 2016
Crypto 2015
FSE 2015
FSE 2014
Asiacrypt 2014
Eurocrypt 2012
Crypto 2012
FSE 2011
Asiacrypt 2011
Crypto 2010